replacing buzzer in dryer

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  #1  
Old 05-02-04, 02:56 PM
melman
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replacing buzzer in dryer

The annoying buzzer in my dryer quit working. I pulled it out and sure enough, it doesn't work when I connect it to power. (It's stamped 120VAC.) I'm sure it's not worth the cost of a new replacement (appliance parts always cost about 3x what they should) and I don't have time to make the rounds of the used appliance/salvage stores.

But it occurs to me that I don't have to replace it with a dryer buzzer as such - I could put in anything that's small and noisy, that runs off 120V. I checked my Handy Box of Junk and didn't see anything immediately useful.

Any suggestions? No, I don't wanna wire it into my PC, or do anything Rube-Goldberg-ish. The cheaper, the better.
 
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Old 05-02-04, 03:26 PM
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You should at least check the price of a replacement buzzer. You've done all the hard work (getting it out ) and I doubt if a replacement would cost more than a few bucks.
 
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Old 05-02-04, 04:35 PM
melman
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The replacement would be about $10, and would have to be ordered. It ain't worth even that much to me.

The wiring diagram shows that two timer terminals are supposed to close to make the buzzer buzz. I checked (ohmmeter across them with the dryer unplugged, turn the timer knob through the cycles), and they don't ever seem to close. It would be an odd coincidence, for both the timer traces AND the buzzer to go bad. And I sure hope that the timer isn't starting to have internal problems. But it's a further reason not to spend money on a new part.

BTW, who moved this out of "Electrical & Electronics"? I flipped a coin between that forum and "Appliances - Electric", and chose the former. Didn't want to post in both places... but "moving" the thread seems to have made it visible in both?
 

Last edited by melman; 05-02-04 at 04:53 PM.
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Old 05-02-04, 04:52 PM
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Hello: Melman

If you elect not to purchase the new replacement part, be sure to either replace the existing part or electrical tape the terminal ends, or cut off the terminal ends and use a wire nut in the wire ends, etc.

The point is not to allow the wires to come into contact with the metal case or any place where they can ground out.

Chances are the end of cycle contacts in the timer control are defective. Thus no buzzer activation.

Regarding the moving of a question:

Questions are moved based on the nature of the question. This question does pertain to electrical but does not fit the guidelines of an electrical forum question.

The question pertains to an appliance with an electrical problem. Which suites this forum best, since the question relates to an appliance. Other members reading this forum also learn from the posts made in this forum and the replies posted to a question.

Therefore, are more likely to look in this forum than the electric forum for appliance electrical problems. Thus the question gets moved accordingly.

When a question gets moved, a redirect is left. The redirect brings the member to the forum in which the post was moved into. The question remains in the original forum so the member can find the new location.

The original question is then a link to the new location. The word moved appears. Members always return to the forum in which the question was posted. Thus the need for the question to become a link to the new forum.
 
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Old 05-02-04, 04:57 PM
melman
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Thanks, note that I just edited my previous message.

If I completely remove the buzzer, there isn't anything to tape off. No loose wires.

How do I prove that the buzzer itself is or isn't bad? I plugged it into a wall outlet, grounding the bracket that attaches to the dryer cabinet... and it doesn't buzz. Is there anything more I should do?
 
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Old 05-02-04, 05:13 PM
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Hi: M

For now and based upon what you already have done testing wise, the buzzed is defective. Now test the timer contacts to the buzzer. If there is continutiy there, timer okay.

If not, may be an forwarning indicating timer is beginning to malfunction. Which may mean timer replacement is also just around the next bend...

Based upon this update you posted, the question now does better suite this forum than the former one. "Perception is not always reality."

Moving the question now makes better sense since other members reading this question, regarding appliance buzzers, are learning more about dryer buzzer problems too....
 
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Old 05-02-04, 05:28 PM
melman
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It's fine that the thread was moved, even better that it can be seen by readers of both forums.

You mentioned "end of cycle contacts". It's not just an end-of-cycle buzzer... it should go off about 5 minutes before the end (when the heater shuts off, I think), and again at the end of the cycle. There's also a "permanent press" cycle (air-fluffs for up to 30 minutes with the buzzer at 5 minute intervals)... but, when I turn the dial past that cycle, I don't hear or feel contacts opening and closing, don't think I ever did.

Checking the buzzer contacts with the power off, I don't see continuity in any part of the timer dial. I connected those contacts to a lamp, and ran the dryer. And wouldn't you know, the lamp lit at the appointed times. I listened really close and didn't hear any contacts clicking when the lamp turned on/off. So I really don't understand how this works. I wonder if it's some sort of capacitive-discharge arrangement.

The buzzer/light only operates for a few seconds, and AFAIK appliance timers aren't that precise. I'm really tempted to open up the timer, but I know better...
 

Last edited by melman; 05-02-04 at 07:09 PM.
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Old 05-04-04, 09:25 AM
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Once again, don't know what model or type of dryer you are working on...model# and brand would help.
Why take the timer apart? You have stated that the lamp did light at the correct times, so the timer is working.

I beilieve you said the buzzer connected directly to the timer. If you connected the lamp directly to the timer and the light lit, than I would assume that you just have 120V going to the buzzer. Your test of connecting the buzzer to 120v was a good test with bad results. Buzzer is bad.

Without knowing all the items in your "bag of tricks" it would be almost impossible to guess what you could hook up to this.
Do you have an 120V fire detector?
How about on of those bells people hook up to their phones, so the whole neighborhood knows they are getting a phone call.

$10.00 isn't a bad price. The ones I looked up ran $35.00 - $40.00. If you still want to hook up "something" in place of the buzzer....you may have to take in account the amount of current that "something" draws through the timer, you may end up melting the contacts in the timer.
 
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Old 05-04-04, 10:27 AM
melman
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My engineer's curiosity wanted to know what was in the timer. As I said in my "lamp experiment", I heard no clicks of contacts opening/closing. Lots of clicks and pops elsewhere, but none during that 5-second period when the lamp lit up.

When I connected my meter to the buzzer contacts on the timer and turned the dial, I couldn't observe them closing at all. Considering that the timer dial turns only part of a revolution in a full cycle, how are you able to get something on a 5 second duty cycle, anyway? I don't think the timer has any electrical components in it, like time-delay relays or such.

By the way - I did go to a used-appliance store, and the owner pulled a buzzer out of an old dryer panel in the salvage room for $2. End of story.

Another part of the mystery, for anyone who cares: the buzzer only buzzes when the dryer runs through the cycle on its own. If you start the dryer, then slowly turn the knob through the cycle by hand, the buzzer will not sound. This may explain why I never saw continuity through the contacts, since I was turning the dial. Hmmm.
 
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Old 05-04-04, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by melman
My engineer's curiosity wanted to know what was in the timer. As I said in my "lamp experiment", I heard no clicks of contacts opening/closing. Lots of clicks and pops elsewhere, but none during that 5-second period when the lamp lit up.
That explains alot!!!!

With all the mini devices used in electronics, there is a very good possibility that there is a RC or LRC circuit inside the timer, or in the buzzer itself with the contacts in the timer completeing the path. This would account for the reason you get no continuity between contacts and the reason it only sounds for 5 seconds. It would even give the manufacturer the run the circuit through differant resisters an change the time constant, to decrease or increase the duration that the buzzer buzzed.

Can you take the Old buzzer apart? File off rivets and seperate the shell, this may reveal more than taking a good timer apart.

Can't blame you on wanting to know....I have learned alot from asking, "How they do that?"
 
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Old 05-04-04, 12:48 PM
melman
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Nothing inside the old buzzer but a coil and a metal plunger that rattles back and forth against the metal cover plate. The coil is open (infinite resistance), I guess the coil wire is broken somewhere.

So the timing must be a RC/RLC gizmo inside the timer, or maybe there's a gear in there that spins a lot faster than the dial...
 
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Old 05-04-04, 01:16 PM
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Another unsolved mystery.

Being an engineer, I am sure when you put the new buzzer in, you located it in some hard to get to area. Perhaps you even used a special holding bracket that requires a "special" tool to get it off.
 
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