freezer too warm


  #1  
Old 02-11-06, 07:41 AM
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freezer too warm

I have a Magic Chef RB15OPW refrigerator (this is a Maytag rebrand I think), and it is not keeping the freezer regulated well. The thermostat control on this one measures the temperature in the fridge, and that temp is staying between 34 and 38 F. The freezer fluctuates between -10 and 25 F, which is bad. There is a freezer temp knob, which regulates cold air between the fridge and freezer, and I have it all the way to the freezer.

One thing is that the machine only turns on twice a day, for a couple hours at a time.

The seals on the freezer look good.

It is amost as if the fridge and freezer sections are not insulated correctly, and the machine isn't cycling enough to keep the freezer cold.

Any ideas??
 
  #2  
Old 02-15-06, 10:25 AM
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Double check the model number.
Make sure to get it off the frig itself and not
the owners manual.
 
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Old 02-15-06, 11:43 AM
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Pull apart evaporator venting?

I rechecked the model number, and it looks correct. It is on the metal tag inside the fridge, and it is clear.

Out of curiousity, I metered the fridge for the last week. It is averaging 1.1 KWH per day, which is pretty low and seems reasonable.

I think I should maybe pull apart the venting from the evaporator to the freezer, and see if the venting to the freezer is partly blocked. This wouldn't explain why the freezer does actually get cold, but maybe I'll discover something. Does this make sense?
 
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Old 02-15-06, 12:01 PM
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Before you go any further I have a question.
Just for a second ignore the temp reading you
took. How is the food actually keeping in the freezer?
By the way there will more than likely be some sort
of shutter in the air duct assem. This is because the air
in the fresh food section comes from the freezer.
 
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Old 02-15-06, 01:08 PM
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The food in the freezer seems to cycle from hard to soft, and freezer burned. I was hoping to find that this was related to the defrost cycle of the freezer - maybe a bad defrost thermostat. But, as I have a nifty power meter hooked up to the thing, I can see that I'm cycling warm even though I'm not drawing any additional current. If I hit defrost mode I would expect to see more than the 140 watts that the machine typically draws, and the pump wouldn't be running while I was drawing current, I think. Over the last couple of weeks I haven't noticed any defrost action, but the food has often gotten above twenty degrees.

So is there any reason to open the thing up? Should I look for anything in particular?
 
  #6  
Old 02-16-06, 10:22 AM
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I would say the ambient temperature is to cold.
Is this refrigerator in the garage ?

Not being specific to your unit,
But you have a classic symptom of the outside temperature being to cold, happens in the winter.
mostly the refrigerators that are kept in the garage.

If the refrigerator section gets to its set temp it turns off the pump so the freezer will not get any colder.
If you warm up the refrigerator section the pump should start up, if its not in the defrost mode (timer).


Or is your freezer fan running continuously ?
 
  #7  
Old 02-17-06, 11:32 AM
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Nice call. This fridge is in an area that we're not using much right now, during a remodel, and the room temp is around 55-60 degrees. Which, if I understand you, will throw off the balance between the fridge and the freezer, as the fridge will lose heat relatively more slowly than the freezer, compared to what it would do at a more normal ambient temp. Would make for a nice physics class problem.

SO, I'll wait until we have this at a normal room temperature and see how the freezer holds up.

Thanks.
 
 

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