Kenmore Dryer C110-8210090

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  #1  
Old 02-21-06, 10:21 AM
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Kenmore Dryer C110-8210090 (now with pics)

That's the dryer I am having problems with. It's taking longer and longer to dry a load of laundry. I've already opened it up and cleaned out a lot of garbage from the duct and blower area.

I've test the element for continuity and it seems to be fine (some please explain the proper way of testing).

While the dryer is running, I opened the door and looked inside and I can see the red hot element glowing behind the metal grate. That's another indication for me that the element is fine.

However this heat is very concentrated and anywhere else that's not close to the grate is only slight warm.

Maybe the blower isn't working??? Or maybe the heating element is hot but not hot enough? Remember it's glowing red when I checked and I didn't dare to touch the metal close to it because I felt the heat.

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a58/zimmerDN/IMG_0566_web.jpg

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a58/zimmerDN/IMG_0567_web.jpg
 

Last edited by zimmerDN; 02-21-06 at 08:41 PM.
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  #2  
Old 02-21-06, 10:25 AM
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I just went outside and checked the vent that leads back to the dryer.

There's plenty of air flow coming out (like a hairblower on the med setting).

However the air is only slightly warm (again, like a hairblower on the med heat setting).

What should I check for next?
 
  #3  
Old 02-21-06, 10:28 AM
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A little bit more info on this dryer.

It's a electric dryer about 12 years old and it's never been serviced. It's been progressively slower at drying clothes.
 
  #4  
Old 02-21-06, 10:38 AM
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Here's more update, my dryer is running at this moment and I am trying to monitor it's progress.

So this time when I opened the dryer door, I can't see the heating element glowing but yet the temp inside is still warm like it was before.

I recall this happening before when i was trying to figure out the problem. To me it seems the dryer would shut off the heating element momentarily and continues to run until everything inside is cool again.

So this might be a themostat problem after all?
 
  #5  
Old 02-21-06, 11:58 AM
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I've test the element for continuity and it seems to be fine (some please explain the proper way of testing).

Testing for continuity is fine. However what I would also do is check to make sure that the element is not shorted to ground anywhere. Pull the plug and check for continuity between each of the element terminals and case ground. You should get no reading or open circuit when checking this.

Is the lint filter on the top of this dryer?
 
  #6  
Old 02-21-06, 12:43 PM
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Yes lint filter goes from the top of the dryer down towards the ground (sitting vertical when inside the dryer). Why do you ask?
 
  #7  
Old 02-21-06, 01:45 PM
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"Why do you ask?"

I ask because the housing itself could be partially blocked. This is something I ran into quite a bit and tends to get overlooked. The area that you need to pay the most attention to is where the filter housing is attached to the blower housing on the back. As you look at the back of the dryer you should see it on the left hand side. Go to the top where the lint filter is and you should see two screws that hold the top to the filter housing once you locate them take them out. Next go to the area where the filter housing attaches to the blower assembly. There should be four hex head screws (1/4 or 5/16 I think) and remove them. Once all the screws are out then separate the filter housing from the blower assembly. Once you get it separated you should see a hole about 3 or 4 inches round in the filter housing. See if there is lint or anything else that doesnt belong. At this point you should be able to see the blower wheel. Make sure its not broken or loose on the motor shaft

Hope this helps.
 
  #8  
Old 02-21-06, 06:30 PM
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I've already taken the filter housing apart before. I am not entirely sure but I remember taking a metal duct out from the back right where the lint filter is and I remember looking in and saw the blower blades.

So I am pretty sure I've cleaned that out pretty good. There were lots there, it even had metal screws or something in it.

Any other suggestions? I will test the element again tomorrow to see if it's grounded to anything.
 
  #9  
Old 02-21-06, 08:39 PM
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Ok, i took the dryer apart again and I tested the element for continuity once more.

I got a tone on my multimeter but it showed about 10 ohms of resistence (tested acrossed the wires on #1 in pic, please confirm if I did it right). I am assuming this is normal?

I tested for continuity of the element to ground and I got nothing, I assume this is a good sign. (I put one the probe from the multimeter on either wire of the element and put the other probe on the metal casing of the dryer itself).

I have a question about a couple of funny looking things on the element which looked like some kind of fuse or themostat. Can someone tell me what each of them are? See the pics below, they are numbered.

I test all of them for continuity and they all seem fine (got a tone).

What else should I test for next?





 
  #10  
Old 02-22-06, 08:18 AM
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Thanks for the pics,

“I got a tone on my multimeter but it showed about 10 ohms of resistance (tested acrossed the wires on #1 in pic, please confirm if I did it right). I am assuming this is normal?”

That looks about right.

“I tested for continuity of the element to ground and I got nothing, I assume this is a good sign.”

Yep..thats good.

“I have a question about a couple of funny looking things on the element which looked like some kind of fuse or themostat. Can someone tell me what each of them are? See the pics below, they are numbered.”

Looking at the second pic number 3 and 5 are safety fuses. as long as the dryer runs or heats at all they are ok. Number 2 is a high limit thermostat and number 4 is the actual cycling thermostat. With the dryer cold all of these devices should show continuity at 0 ohms.

“What else should I test for next?”

The lint filter, take the filter and hold it under a steam of cold water. Does the filter tend to hold any water? If it does then clean it with hot soapy water and a scrub brush. It wouldnt be a bad idea
to do this reguardless. Then try a load and see how it drys.
By the way if by chance you are running plastic flex vent then get rid of it
and replace it with aluminum.
 
  #11  
Old 02-22-06, 09:12 AM
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I do have plastic flex vents but I've had plastic ones for the life of the dryer (these ones are only 2yr old). What's wrong with plastic?

I will try to clean the lint filter but I am almost certain it's not a airflow problem becaues I went outside and there was plenty of air flow coming out of the vent (only warm air though).


I will also run the dryer without the vent hose connected and see.

In the mean time, keep the comments coming.
 
  #12  
Old 02-22-06, 09:35 AM
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I just cleaned the lint filter and it was clean to begin with but I did it anyway.

I ran the dryer without the vent hose and for the first 5 mins it started to blow out warm air. Then at about 7 mins I heard a click and it started blowing out cold air after. The air was never that hot to begin with, it was only warm.

So maybe there's something wrong with the hi-limit thermostat or cycling thermostat that shuts down the heating element early?

I want this to be fixed so bad.
 
  #13  
Old 02-22-06, 09:56 AM
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Son of a *****. It's working again. Like I thought it did last time.

I think my problem is ventilation? Because the last time when I had the dryer away from the wall while I was trying to fix it, it ran fine.

Maybe the flex vent hose is too close to the wall and it angles upward from the floor too quickly and most of the hot air isn't able to escape (it's as short as it can be and it's a straight shot up to the ceiling after the 90 degree turn from the dryer)? I did go outside to check the airflow out of the vent before all this and there was plenty even though it was only warm air coming out.

I just dried my bed sheets in 15 mins which it would've taken at least 30 mins before. The air coming out the back of the unvented dryer is burning hot (can't keep my hand there for more then 1 mins).

Can someone explain why metal flex vent is better then plastic?
 
  #14  
Old 02-22-06, 10:07 AM
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“What's wrong with plastic?”

Number one it’s combustible meaning a fire hazard.
Just about all cases I’ve seen or heard where a dryer caused a house fire were due to vent combustion. The air that passes through the vent can reach 250 degrees plus. Not exactly something you want to expose to a piece of plastic which is not much more than twice the thickness of a trash bag.
Secondly the spiral wire ridges cause an air restriction which can lead to a build up of lint in areas where it doesn’t belong which in itself can start a fire. My first choice is 4 inch solid aluminum
using straight sections and elbows. If you have a tight spot you can use one of these.
http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1276778&cp=1254880.1255016.1306415&parentPage=family&searchId=1306415

There is semi rigid aluminum vent that comes in a 4 foot section and extends out to as much as 8 feet. I’ve used this with an elbow at each end and it works fine.

“I will also run the dryer without the vent hose connected and see.”

Keep in mind that if you dry any clothes with the vent disconnected you may extend the dry time.
The reason for this is that the moisture from the clothes will put inside the house and unit will try to dry clothes with air that’s saturated with moisture

One other thing to keep in mind is that the air temp comming out of the
back vent is not going to remain constant it will fluctuate.
 
  #15  
Old 02-22-06, 10:16 AM
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Well I thought the problem is solved but i was wrong again.

After drying my bedsheets I put in the pillows and let it run for 40 mins. I went upstairs for 15-20 mins to grab something to eat and came back down to find the dryer blowing out cold air again.

I disconnected it immediately and took my multimeter to the hi-limit themostat I got a tone.

Why is this happening?
 
  #16  
Old 02-22-06, 10:23 AM
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The next time you catch it blowing out cold air set your meter so that you can measure AC voltage.
While its running and blowing cold air see if you are getting 230 volts at the main heat element terminals.
 
  #17  
Old 02-22-06, 11:07 AM
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You are saying I should put the multimeter across the terminals of #1 in the pictures right? While it's running.... I guess I should be careful because I don't want to experience a 240V shocking experience.

Oh, and I assume polarity doesn't matter.
 
  #18  
Old 02-22-06, 11:29 AM
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The dryer is running and I am waiting for it to get cold again.

I am still concern about sticking my multimeter across the terminal... I've never dealt with AC with a multimeter especially high voltage. I checked my multimeter and it can handle up to 700V but it's got some awefully thin wires on those probes. But I guess as long as the current going through them is low the wires and the meter will be fine. God, I hope i will be too haha. Time to put on rubber boots.
 
  #19  
Old 02-22-06, 11:46 AM
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You won’t hurt the meter as long as you have set on the correct range.
Set the meter on the AC volts if the meter is auto ranging it will set for the proper level of voltage automatically. If it’s not then set it for one of the AC ranges that is higher than 230 volts. Just be careful not to touch any part of the metal probe when making the measurement. Also be careful not to let one of the metal probes touch the connection and ground at the same time. Carefully
measure across the main two terminals of the element itself or #1 of your photo. If you want you can try this while its heating in order to see what the proper reading looks like. It should read 220-230 Volts ac. Polarity doesnt matter.

Be careful and good luck.
 
  #20  
Old 02-22-06, 12:01 PM
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I just checked. The element cycles off and on every 5 mins. I could see the elements goes from glowing red to nothing in a matter of 10 secs and then it kicks back on again in 5 mins.

There's 220V across when it's on and there's 10-20V when it's off. It usually clicks before the element cools down and the voltage drops.
 
  #21  
Old 02-22-06, 12:21 PM
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It usually clicks before the element cools down and the voltage drops.

Ok check where the clicking is coming from. It should be at the cycling stat or #4 on you photo.
It should not be coming from the stat thats mounted on the element.
 
  #22  
Old 02-22-06, 12:24 PM
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How do I check that? I don't think I can do it by listening because it's pretty loud back there with air blowing at me. Can I do it with my multimeter?
 
  #23  
Old 02-22-06, 12:38 PM
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Ding Ding Ding... we have a winner.

I ran the dryer until the element shutoff. I disconnected the power quickly and did the continuity test on all the thermostat. And the winner is......


#2.... the high limit themostat. My gut instinct was right from the beginning. Does this mean I can just go to sears and replace #2 the high limit themostat?
 
  #24  
Old 02-22-06, 12:39 PM
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Btw, once it cooled down enough #2 clicked and I got a tone again on the multimeter. I hope my testing method was correct.
 
  #25  
Old 02-22-06, 12:45 PM
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“How do I check that? I don't think I can do it by listening because it's pretty loud back there with air blowing at me. Can I do it with my multimeter?”

The wires at the heating element that you just checked should be marked H1 and H2. The wires on the cycling stat or #4 should be marked HT1 and HT3
It may take some handling of the wires in order to locate these ID marking so shut the dryer off and unplug it when checking to avoid shock. Unless of course you can already see them. Remember these markings are printed on the wires themselves.
Once you know which is which you can run this test. When the unit cycles the heater off check for 230v between the H2 terminal on the heater and the HT3 terminal on the cycling thermostat or #4 on your photo. You should not get 230 volts if it’s cycled off. You should get it when it cycles back on.
 
  #26  
Old 02-22-06, 01:19 PM
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I will test across H2 and HT3 terminal when I get back. I have to run to the store to get a few things and mail something before the post office closes. Thank you for the great help so far.

BTW, 2 posts up from this, is that any indication of anything? I found which device was clicking.
 
  #27  
Old 02-23-06, 01:19 PM
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Just as you said. I didn't get any voltage across H2 & HT3 when it cycled off and when it cycled on it had 240V across.
 
  #28  
Old 02-23-06, 04:14 PM
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I'm leaning towards a bad cycling thermostat as the problem. This is provided that you are getting proper air flow through the dryer. One other thing you can check is the rear drum seal. To get to it you have to lift the top. It goes around the entire circumference of the rear side of the drum. If this has excessive wear or is damaged then it needs replaced.
 
  #29  
Old 02-23-06, 06:50 PM
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ok I will try to replace the cycling thermostat tomorrow. It think it's only $8 from sears.
 
  #30  
Old 02-25-06, 04:07 PM
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Well I spent $40 and got a cycling themostat from Sears. It's not a geniune but a generic subsitute with a dial in the middle. I put it on the right setting (D, according to the sheet) and tried to dry a load of laundry.

Same result. Dries slow and it still cycles on and off like before. Any clue?
 
  #31  
Old 02-25-06, 05:16 PM
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"Well I spent $40 and got a cycling themostat from Sears. It's not a geniune but a generic subsitute "

Is there a 6 or 7 digit number on the original stat anywhere?
Also is there a number that starts with an L?

"Same result. Dries slow and it still cycles on and off like before. Any clue?"

Ok when the air comming out is cold where exactly is the timer dial pointing
at on the console?

How well is your washer spinning the clothes out? That can contribute heavily
to dry time.
 

Last edited by Gmaxx; 02-25-06 at 05:51 PM.
  #32  
Old 02-26-06, 08:31 AM
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Talking

This is the info on the original thermostat.

312633
T-O-D 60T11
660039
00341146
9341
L150-20F


This is the info for new themostat

694674 (Adjustable)


It can start blowing out not so warm to cold air anywhere on the dial (like 5 mins after the 60 min cycle begun). If you want me to be more precise. I can go find out with another load of laundry.

You are so right about the washer not spinning clothes as dry as it used to. I never considered that as a source of problem and I should since the washer is just as old as the dryer. However I don't notice clothes coming out from the washer is any wetter (or dryer) now than 10 years ago. It's something that's harder to gauge.

I do remember my dryer being much hotter 12 years ago because my cat used to love to lay on top of the hot dryer while it's running. Now the top of the dryer is barely warm while it's running and my cat has since given up this favour spot about 4 years ago. So my 14 year old cat has been bugging me to fix the dryer too so he can have his favourite spot back.
 
  #33  
Old 02-26-06, 08:34 AM
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80 mins to do a load of laundry is a little riduclous isn't it? That's the maxium time on the dial. When it was new it only took 30 mins per load, then 50, then 60 and now 80-10mins.
 
  #34  
Old 02-26-06, 09:08 PM
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Ok there are two main things that need to be considered when dealing with this sort of thing the first is airflow. Simply put you have to have enough air flowing through the right places to get the evaporated moisture where its ultimately suppose to go and thats outside. The lack of airflow going through the element can cause it to shut down when its not suppose to. This can lead to not enough heat getting through the drum and out the vent. This is why I focused on that part of it first. "Provided" the airflow is good and the heating element is ok the only other thing that controls the temp is the thermostat that you replaced. There is a high limit stat on the element housing. This stat will cut the heat off for two reasons either there is still not enough air running across the heating element or the stat is bad and is cutting off too soon. The airflow cause is much more common. The high limit stat cutting in and out during the cycle is not considered normal operation. Here is one way to find out if the high limit is cycling. The next time you catch the heat cycled off in the middle of a cycle take your volt meter and connect one probe to the H2 wire on the heating element. Now take the other probe and take a reading on each of the two terminals on the high limit stat. If you get 230 volts on one terminal of the stat and not the other then its cycling out on the high limit which is not normal. Remember always keep one of the probes connected the H2 element wire when doing this.
 
  #35  
Old 02-27-06, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Gmaxx
If you get 230 volts on one terminal of the stat and not the other then its cycling out on the high limit which is not normal. Remember always keep one of the probes connected the H2 element wire when doing this.

You hit the jack pot ther maxx. I got 230V on the HT3-HS1 terminal and not the other. I already have the hi-limit themostat (only $12) so I guess I can put it in and it should solve all my problems?
 
  #36  
Old 02-27-06, 04:31 PM
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"so I guess I can put it in and it should solve all my problems?"

As long as you haven’t overlooked anything that can cause an airflow problem yes. But if you still have something that’s causing an issue with air flow then you will still have trouble with it until it’s been resolved.

Good luck
 

Last edited by Gmaxx; 02-27-06 at 04:49 PM.
  #37  
Old 02-28-06, 11:54 AM
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I just replaced the Hi-Limit themostat and put in a load of laundry.

It's running good as new right now. I already know it's working even though it's only 10 mins into cycle. This is be cause the top of the dryer is getting really hot like it was when it was new. I think my cat will really appreciate this.

The hi-limit themostat came with two piece. One I replaced, the other I am not sure what to do with it. I think it's the other fuse on the element but I didn't replace it because I am not sure. I will post a picture of it later tonight.

Thanks for everything GMaxx. Do you do this for a living? You seem to know what exactly each wire does.
 
  #38  
Old 02-28-06, 12:18 PM
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The hi-limit themostat came with two piece. One I replaced, the other I am not sure what to do with it. I think it's the other fuse on the element but I didn't replace it because I am not sure. I will post a picture of it later tonight.

I already know what it is. Its a non resettable safety fuse. It cuts the heat completely off in the event that the high limit stat were to fail and not cycle off. In your case it was the other way around it was cycling off too soon rather than too late. They sell them together because if the heater fuse fails you should always replace the high limit stat with it.

Do you do this for a living?

I did in home service since the mid 80s until just a few years ago. A medical condition has taken me off the road until further notice. Right now I do electronics repair from my home.
 
  #39  
Old 02-28-06, 02:52 PM
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Wink

Good luck with your health. You're are a great contributor to this community.


I just put everything back in place and installed the new aluminum vent. That was a pain to put on because it's only 8' and that's just enough to reach the dryer. The vent isn't holding onto the dryer pipe too good because the metal vent from the dryer is only sticking out by 1" beyond the back panel. I hope my zip tie will hold.

Right now the plug for the dryer is right behind the vent. I wonder if the heat will be high enough to melt my plug. I'll have to think of something to separate the two.

Yah my last load of laundry was completely dried after 60mins and I am confident that it could've been done in 50mins or less. So I guess it's really working.

I took some pictures of the seal around the drums today. Would you like to inspect them if I post them?
 
  #40  
Old 02-28-06, 03:42 PM
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Right now the plug for the dryer is right behind the vent. I wonder if the heat will be high enough to melt my plug. I'll have to think of something to separate the two.

No the temp would have to get much hotter than it does to cause a problem there.

I took some pictures of the seal around the drums today. Would you like to inspect them if I post them?

Thats fine.
 
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