GE Ice Maker Supply Line Freezing up


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Old 07-30-07, 10:10 AM
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GE Ice Maker Supply Line Freezing up

I have a GE TFX25. We have had ice production problems and a service guy determined that the ice maker supply line was freezing up inside the freezer. Ice was forming in the line causing water to spray inside and pushing connections at the ice maker and outside of the freezer. We cleared the jam but still had problems. The repair guy suggested it was the water pressure from the RO unit.

I re-plumbed the line from the RO unit and still had the line freezing up. The GE site suggested this test to see if I had enough pressure:
Test the water pressure:
* Dispense water from the dispenser into a large measuring cup for 20 seconds. If the measuring cup contains less than 13.5 ounces (400 metric centimeters), the water flow is inadequate.

I got 16 ounces out of this test. I also measured the output going to the ice maker and got 4 ounces in 5 seconds. That seems barely enough to make cubes but inline with the first test's pressure. How much volume should go into the tray to make a set of cubes?

I guess I can check for obstructions in the line up to the freezer from the bottom of the refrigerator, but what if that is not the issue?
 
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Old 07-30-07, 05:59 PM
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Many times low water pressure will cause this, but that seems to be ruled out in your case. I think I would get another piece of tubing and attach it to the inlet valve. Run this piece to a container and see if you get any water while the power is off to the valve. I'm thinking you might have a valve that is not shutting completely off. hard water might cause this. What kind of water pipes do you have in your house?
 
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Old 07-30-07, 11:06 PM
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Valve shutting off

I doubt hard water has hurt the valve. We have always had the filter. You may be on to something on the valve but I'm not sure what you mean by "power is off to the valve" If I pull the plug the valve won't do anything will it?
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-01-07 at 10:06 AM. Reason: Unnecessary quote removed
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Old 08-01-07, 08:06 AM
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Killing the power to the valve will make the valve inoperable. The purpose of killing the power is to see if the valve is allowing water to bypass even when there is no signal from the switch to do so. Hole in diaphram, stretched diaphram, speck of mineral deposit (even with a filter). These are possibilities that come to mind. Water pressure has been ruled out as the cause, inlet valve would be next logical possibility.

Been a while, someone correct me if the valve has no diaphram.

Regardless, kill the power to the valve. If water still goes through it, you know it is bad. Should be no need to kill the power to the fridge, just the valve. Well, you might want to pull the plug until you get the valve connection pulled off then plug the fridge back in. Let it sit for a while with no power. Maybe overnight with the tube in a container big enough to hold the excess amount that may be getting past the valve.

Where does the water spray? Inside the walls? In the freezer compartment? How long does it take to refreeze or get blocked again when cleared? See if you can determine if the inside of the inlet tube where it enters the freezer compartment is smooth.
 
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Old 08-01-07, 03:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Moondoggie41 View Post
I doubt hard water has hurt the valve. We have always had the filter. You may be on to something on the valve but I'm not sure what you mean by "power is off to the valve" If I pull the plug the valve won't do anything will it?
"We have always had the filter."

How long have you had this same filter? Inline filters will sometimes clog up with chemicals removed from the water and cause low water pressure from that point on. You should get between 4 1/2 to 5 ounces of water per cycle to the icemaker.
 
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Old 08-13-07, 09:28 AM
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Problem Solved

Kudos to Bowman47! You were exactly right on my problem.

I did test the valve by disconnecting the power. Sure enough, the valve did allow water to pass even though it had no power to open. This leak was causing water to dribble into the freezer section and clog the ice maker supply tube.

Anyone reading this should know that this was a surprisingly easy fix on the GE refrigerator. The valve has modular connections so you can remove power to any of its 4 outlets or to the whole thing. The lines did not require any "plumbing" to re-connect the tubes going to various locations in the refrigerator. You simply push the tube into the connection.

The cheapest price I found was about $62 at RepairClinic.com

My ice bin is now full!
 
 

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