Old Amana Fridge blowing fuse


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Old 10-18-07, 12:56 PM
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Question Old Amana Fridge blowing fuse

My Amana fridge (about 25 yr) started blowing the fuse. As soon as I plug it in it blows! Fridge & freezer setting are in off position. Tested wire and plug -ok. tested compressor - ok. when I removed the relay (solid state) from compressor then it did not blow.
 
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Old 10-18-07, 12:59 PM
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Wink

when I removed the relay (solid state) from compressor then it did not blow.
Have to ask then why didnt you get a new relay???
 
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Old 10-18-07, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Ed Imeduc View Post
Have to ask then why didnt you get a new relay???
It is hard to get parts were I live and was wondering if there is a way to test the relay first - or if it is possible that it could be the timer or s/t else - what to test first?
 
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Old 10-18-07, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by starkd View Post
It is hard to get parts were I live and was wondering if there is a way to test the relay first - or if it is possible that it could be the timer or s/t else - what to test first?
It's blowing a fuse or circuit breaker? If a fuse, what kind? one time fuse or time delay fuse? We need a better definition of what you mean when you say this and that tested ok. Did you check the compressor motor for a grounded winding? With the controls turned off there is still a circuit, Since it stops blowing the fuse, when you take out the relay it's probably the compressor. By removing the relay, you removed the compressor motor windings from the circuit. Do you have an ohmeter? If so, test from the pins on the compressor to a CLEAN spot on the largest tubing at the compressor to see if the windings are grounded. [scratch a clean spot and remove all wiring to the compressor, you want just the pins sticking out] If the windings are ok, then get a SUPCO 3-in-1 start device. You can see one at www.supco.com It comes with easy to follow instructions. You can order one online form appliance parts websites or maybe HVAC websites. Do a search. Let us know what you find. Thanks.
 
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Old 10-23-07, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by daddyjohn View Post
It's blowing a fuse or circuit breaker? If a fuse, what kind? one time fuse or time delay fuse? We need a better definition of what you mean when you say this and that tested ok. Did you check the compressor motor for a grounded winding? With the controls turned off there is still a circuit, Since it stops blowing the fuse, when you take out the relay it's probably the compressor. By removing the relay, you removed the compressor motor windings from the circuit. Do you have an ohmeter? If so, test from the pins on the compressor to a CLEAN spot on the largest tubing at the compressor to see if the windings are grounded. [scratch a clean spot and remove all wiring to the compressor, you want just the pins sticking out] If the windings are ok, then get a SUPCO 3-in-1 start device. You can see one at www.supco.com It comes with easy to follow instructions. You can order one online form appliance parts websites or maybe HVAC websites. Do a search. Let us know what you find. Thanks.
Thanks for all your help. It seems it's the compressor after all - although my husband is having a hard time with that decision . It tests fine on his ohmeter - but he would like to get a more proffesional one to test it. we tried disconecting the fan and the timer to rule those out. It keeps on coming back to the compressor - so while he is looking for a better ohmeter, I am looking into used refrigerators.
Thanks again
 
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Old 10-23-07, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by starkd View Post
Thanks for all your help. It seems it's the compressor after all - although my husband is having a hard time with that decision . It tests fine on his ohmeter - but he would like to get a more proffesional one to test it. we tried disconecting the fan and the timer to rule those out. It keeps on coming back to the compressor - so while he is looking for a better ohmeter, I am looking into used refrigerators.
Thanks again
Compressor testing-

There are 3 pins on the compressor. Remove all external wiring/devices before testing. Scratch a clean place on the larger copper tubing going to the compressor and then test from each pin to the tubing. You're testing for a grounded motor. You get infinite resistance , iow- no continuity at all. Next, test from pin to pin. The readings will be very low so you need a digital meter. Testing pin to pin; 0 ohms = a shorted winding Otherwise you should see low resistances usually under 15 ohms. A Radio Shack analog meter isn't good enough for this test. HD & Lowe's have some low cost digital meters that will work. I found a Greenlee meter at Lowe's that comes with a receptacle tester, a non contact voltage tester and a nice case. I think it was about $30. If the compressor checks out ok, it's possible the coil on the compressor starting relay is compromised. It's also possible that the compressor is mechanically locked up, but that would not immediately blow the fuse. Have you tried another outlet? Maybe you have a bad outlet?
 
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Old 10-24-07, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by daddyjohn View Post
Compressor testing-

There are 3 pins on the compressor. Remove all external wiring/devices before testing. Scratch a clean place on the larger copper tubing going to the compressor and then test from each pin to the tubing. You're testing for a grounded motor. You get infinite resistance , iow- no continuity at all. Next, test from pin to pin. The readings will be very low so you need a digital meter. Testing pin to pin; 0 ohms = a shorted winding Otherwise you should see low resistances usually under 15 ohms. A Radio Shack analog meter isn't good enough for this test. HD & Lowe's have some low cost digital meters that will work. I found a Greenlee meter at Lowe's that comes with a receptacle tester, a non contact voltage tester and a nice case. I think it was about $30. If the compressor checks out ok, it's possible the coil on the compressor starting relay is compromised. It's also possible that the compressor is mechanically locked up, but that would not immediately blow the fuse. Have you tried another outlet? Maybe you have a bad outlet?
Thanks again!
the ohmeter is a digital one (Beckman Indusrial) and everything checks out exactly as you said it should. My husband also suspected a mechanical lock up - but didn't know that that should not trip the cb - wich it does right away (btw - it's a circuit breaker but not gfi). The relay is a solid state in good condition (not burnt - clean - no rattling) so my husband thinks it's good.
We really apreciate all your effort to help us!
 
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Old 10-24-07, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by starkd View Post
Thanks again!
the ohmeter is a digital one (Beckman Indusrial) and everything checks out exactly as you said it should. My husband also suspected a mechanical lock up - but didn't know that that should not trip the cb - wich it does right away (btw - it's a circuit breaker but not gfi). The relay is a solid state in good condition (not burnt - clean - no rattling) so my husband thinks it's good.
We really apreciate all your effort to help us!
Normally, when a compressor is locked up, what will happen is it will try to start, draw high current for a few seconds and then the motor overload will open with an audible click. I'm not saying it won't trip the c/b but usually the compressor motor will cycle off on its' overload. Did you try plugging into another circuit to eliminate the possibility of a weak c/b or a bad outlet? If you put everything back together, then test at the fridge's cordset [the male pug] from each flat spade to the round ground spade do you get a reading or do you read infinite resistance?
 

Last edited by daddyjohn; 10-24-07 at 01:30 PM. Reason: add txt
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Old 10-24-07, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by daddyjohn View Post
Normally, when a compressor is locked up, what will happen is it will try to start, draw high current for a few seconds and then the motor overload will open with an audible click. I'm not saying it won't trip the c/b but usually the compressor motor will cycle off on its' overload. Did you try plugging into another circuit to eliminate the possibility of a weak c/b or a bad outlet? If you put everything back together, then test at the fridge's cordset [the male pug] from each flat spade to the round ground spade do you get a reading or do you read infinite resistance?
Yeah - I'm afraid we did - plug into a few diff. circuit - @with the same result (just diff. parts of the house went) I am pretty sure that the 1st thing my husband checked when this all started was the plug (he has this theory of going from the easy to the hard) - but I will double check with him when he gets home later and let you know.
Thanks once again
 
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Old 10-24-07, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by starkd View Post
Yeah - I'm afraid we did - plug into a few diff. circuit - @with the same result (just diff. parts of the house went) I am pretty sure that the 1st thing my husband checked when this all started was the plug (he has this theory of going from the easy to the hard) - but I will double check with him when he gets home later and let you know.
Thanks once again
Well the idea behind checking the plug spades to the ground prong is to see if you get a ground reading. If yes, start disconnecting components untill the ground goes away. I agree, simple to hard is the way to go. It doesn't make sense that the compressor checks ok but the c/b trips right away.
 
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Old 10-29-07, 02:32 AM
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Originally Posted by daddyjohn View Post
Well the idea behind checking the plug spades to the ground prong is to see if you get a ground reading. If yes, start disconnecting components untill the ground goes away. I agree, simple to hard is the way to go. It doesn't make sense that the compressor checks ok but the c/b trips right away.
Thanks for being so patient with us. After your last reply we started having hope again that it was not the compressor indeed. Well, it turns out there was one thing we forgot to check. We have not replaced the light in years and forgot it exsisted - it was not exactly easy to find the conection to the socket either. Well - lo and behold - that was the problem! Fridge is working fine now (may it have a long life!)
Thanks again!
The Starks
 
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Old 10-29-07, 05:11 PM
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I am so happy to hear that! Sometimes you have to a bulldog when looking for a problem. I hope it runs another 25 years. he he
 
 

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