amana dryer problems

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Old 10-27-07, 01:15 PM
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amana dryer problems

I did read the FAQ, but did not come across my exact problem. I am hoping for some advice on what to do.

My dryer (Amana Model LED20AW - about 8 years old) will start and run for about 10 minutes or so (just until it heats up I presume) and then stop. If you try to restart it, it will try to start a couple of times and then go completely dead as if unplugged. After it cools off, 30 minutes or so, it can be restarted. Any suggestions on what to check/replace? I presume it must be some sort of thermostat or heat safety feature kicking in.

I will check venting, but I am pretty sure that is clean.

Thanks- Craig
 
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Old 10-27-07, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by csl72 View Post
I did read the FAQ, but did not come across my exact problem. I am hoping for some advice on what to do.

My dryer (Amana Model LED20AW - about 8 years old) will start and run for about 10 minutes or so (just until it heats up I presume) and then stop. If you try to restart it, it will try to start a couple of times and then go completely dead as if unplugged. After it cools off, 30 minutes or so, it can be restarted. Any suggestions on what to check/replace? I presume it must be some sort of thermostat or heat safety feature kicking in.

I will check venting, but I am pretty sure that is clean.

Thanks- Craig
What happens if you run it in air dry? IOW- no heat. Same thing?
 
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Old 10-27-07, 02:25 PM
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Also could be motor limit due to bearing drag, idler pulley drag, or rollers (if you have them; some don't) drag. As another area where to look. To determine this one can easily remove the belt off the idler pulley and try turning the drum by hand (could be sock or ? in blower wheel causing drag), spinning the idler pulley by hand and turning the motor shaft and wiggling it to see if there is bearing slop in it from side to side (not end to end).
 
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Old 10-27-07, 07:52 PM
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tried running without heat. It did not shut down (although I assume it would have eventually), I opened the dryer after 10 minutes or so and it would not restart. Onto the pulley and motor issues.

Thanks
 
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Old 10-28-07, 11:44 AM
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Is the dryer noisy when running? Like a noisy bearing? When you tried the restart did you hear a buzzing/humming noise or nothing?
 
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Old 10-28-07, 01:54 PM
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Besides a bad centrigugal switch with the motor causing an initial start button activated buzz-sound coming from the motor, if there is a buzz sound, the buzz could be from load on motor from causes I listed. A real must to check this stuff out.
 
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Old 10-28-07, 03:52 PM
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To answer questions on the last two posts - The dryer is not particularly noisy when running. When you try to restart it, there is first some noise (buzzing, or an attempt to start, but then the entire thing shuts down (no noise or attempt to start at all)

I have a feeling ecman may be on the right track and it is some load issue with the motor.

anyone aware of a good dissasembly procedure for this type on the web? I am still trying to figure a way to get to the motor area. Access only appears possible by removing the drum (I don't see how you could try turning the drum after removing the belt as you suggested yesterday ecman, as the drum would come out to get to the belt and motor area. I may be out of my depth on this one and need an actual pro to check it out. If any of you could point me in the right direction on access to the motor area I would sure appeciate it.

A friend with more experience than myself is stopping by tomorrow after work. Pointers on access would help us out I think just so that we could get to the darn motor for testing!

Thanks all
 
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Old 10-28-07, 05:03 PM
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I work on different dryers (Amanas being in several of the rentals) and can't keep them all straight as to dismantling. All I know is _I_ can get them dismantled.

Does yours have a removeable front panel, or two separate front panels? Panels are removeable unless there is no seam as it turns the corner (in other words if no seam, the front is connected seamless to the sides.)

Does your dryer have 2 screws at the front at the very bottom, or not?

Or does your dryer have seams just around the corner of the front and no screws at the bottom?

Have you looked behind the dryer to see if there is this access panel held on by one or 2 sheetmetal screws, that is louvered?

I tried bringing up your model # and got hits on sites but is taking me too long to find a pic.
 
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Old 10-29-07, 07:20 AM
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details

There are no access panels on the sides or back, it is one wrap around piece for the sides and back (no joints). The only acccess panel at the rear is the small (3" diameter)one at the top for the power source.
The front has the 2 screws on the bottom to remove the bottom panel. (its a two panel design) You then have the upper door panel assembly.
I have removed those two sections. The next level is the front support for the drum wich is like a cross brace (I removed this, but have since put it back on as I was not sure if I was proceeding correctly).
Do I need to take the drum out to get to the motor? It seems like the only other alternative is to take the blower and whatnot attached to it out from the front after removing the cross brace, but leaving the drum in. I'm not certain the you can remove the blower etc. without removing the drum as the drum may block access to rear screws (if any) that you need.

The blower and motor are on the right side of the machine.

At the office now, but I should have taken pictures.

thanks again
 
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Old 10-29-07, 05:29 PM
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That's okay about the pics. I know what you are dealing with now. Can't you at least SEE the motor back there and get your hands on the idler pulley from below?

I did one of these 2-front-panel machines (with wrap around sides/back) machines just months ago, and had it all apart. Yes you have to take off the supports in front to get out the drum, it seems to my memory. If my memory also serves me, I remember mumbling to myself that if they can make dryers like Xxxxxxx brand, then why couldn't they have designed THIS one like that! But - I got it all fixed. If you have a mind where you are able to say, "Now let's see here, this is connected to that, so that means....". That's what it takes sometimes if you are not schooled in these things.

If you don't have that kind of mind where you can't look and dismantle and reassemble it the same way, then one usually doesn't have the mechanical aptitude to tackle such jobs from appliances to car repair,where it requires a lot of not only dismantling, but visual acuteness to determine other associated things while you have it apart. It's not worth the effort of all the dismantling if you dont' know say enough to check for bearing play, tensions, willingness to vacuum out everything!, check exhaust passageways, make sure to clean blower wheel, that it turns free and is not jammed, that felt and teflon front slides front drum supports), that rear support bearing or rollers (which ever is applicable, as it will be an either-or thing) will last till the next time you have to service inside) are in good shape, belt has no cracks when flexed, etc. Unless everything is checked while you are in there, then it makes no sense to DIY.
 
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Old 10-29-07, 07:14 PM
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I think that might be the best advice. I don't think I can just feel my way through this one being that it is not exactly new and may have more than one issue that needs addressed. Time to call in some professional assistance I guess.

Thanks for your efforts
 
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Old 10-30-07, 06:39 AM
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My intent was not to scare you off, either. -I- was never schooled in these things when I started. But I was able to do these anyway because my history goes way back with mechanics/hands on variosu tools/how connectors are fastened, etc., in various fields, and once you get experience in various mechanical things, for some reason your mind opens up with the ability to ask questions as you go, to yourself, as to what does what and what really needs addressing.

If you have such aptitude, and like little challenges, you can do it.

Of all the appliances, dryers are the easisest thing to diagnose/work on IMO, as the operation is basically the same in each one, albeit one brand might have a different drum support system. But even with that there are usually only 2 different methods employed. Not dozens, or something.

Each machine has wires usually easy to physically trace; most regualr machines are 240 volt; has a control panel which rarely is any issue; a timer; a drum ; a belt; 1 drive motor; 1 blower motor, a 4 inch duct; an idler pulley/belt tensioner; about 3 stats; an element which may either be around the perimeter behind the drum or one mounted down low at the rear; a center rear bearing support or rollers; and front felt seal and teflon glides and that is about it, for any machine out there. Then it just comes down to figuring how it comes apart (usually simple if you stare), and observation and/or hearing sounds, and ability to use a multimeter in the case of the element or stats, and perhaps a thermometer to check the range of heat output at the rear vent (there is an ongoing temp swing from when the operating stat kicks on and then kicks off)

Let us know about your machine no matter which route you go.
 
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