Correct Circuit & Wire for Electric Range

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-22-07, 01:47 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Correct Circuit & Wire for Electric Range

We have propane heat & stove and the price on propane is getting more outrageous than electric so we are converting our gas range to electric. We purchased a used electric range and have no manual. It's a Kenmore (911.91181890). I wanted to see if anyone could answer my question.

We are not sure what size circuit and wire to use to run the range since we do not have a manual. The only thing on the plate on the stove itself states its rated at 9.3 kw. I have read a couple other posts which state the National Electrical Code is 40 amp / 8.3 gauge wire. However, a local guy is telling me I can get away with 30 amp / 10.3. When I went to the local Lowes to pick up the adapter to plug the stove into, the circuit & wire, the adapter itself states its "50A". Does this mean that is the highest it can go or is this what needs to be used? Also, can I get away with 30 / 10.3 with the 9.3 kw rating? I do know it has to be a double circuit. I do not want to burn my house down.

Any information would be helpful! Thanks!

thewainrights
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-22-07, 11:59 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,021
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi:

You can't use a 30 amp circuit. If a range is rated at less than 12 KW, code does allow a 40 amp circuit. Since you have to put in a new circuit, it's best to install a 50 amp circuit. You never know if you might upgrade your range at a later date. Now here's a problem that needs addressing. Since 1996, 3 wire circuits for ranges are no longer allowed. You'll want to run a 4 wire circuit [2 hots, a neutral and a ground] In the back of the range at the terminal block, you'll find a bonding strap that goes from the neutral connection to the cabinet. You want to remove the strap. You'll also need a 4 prong receptacle and a 4 prong cordset. Again. since you're installing a new circuit, you want to go with what's current. If you upgrade in the future you'll need a 4 wire circuit anyway.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: