Electric stove burners not getting hot


  #1  
Old 05-04-09, 06:30 AM
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Exclamation Electric stove burners not getting hot

I am currently remodeling my home, we moved the physical location of the stove and had the wiring redone as well. The stove is using a 3-wire installation to two 110 units on the cirucit breaker. We are able to test and see that each is receiving 110 at the wall. We purchased a used range and the oven worked but none of the burners. The clock worked as well. Now we purchased a brand new stove and it is doing the exact same thing. The oven works, but not on broil and none of the burners are getting hot. The lights are on indicating that the burner is on but it is not getting hot. The person that installed the wiring cannot figure out what could be causing this. Any suggestions would be very helpful.
 
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Old 05-04-09, 06:37 AM
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You said "The stove is using a 3-wire installation to two 110 units on the circuit breaker." Did you run the wire to a 220 breaker or just two individual 110 breakers?

Bud
 
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Old 05-04-09, 06:45 AM
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Well, until the Pro's get here....
1. I believe you needed to change the wiring to a 4 wire if you made any modifications.
2. It should be a 220/240 double pole breaker, not two 110/120
3. You should be getting 220/240 across the two hot legs at the oven, 110/120 to ground on each side, but 220/240 across the hots.
4. Sounds like whoever did the wiring didn't do it right.
 
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Old 05-04-09, 07:34 AM
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The wire is run to two individual 110 breakers
 
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Old 05-04-09, 07:42 AM
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Well, there's the problem....you need to get someone who knows more about electrical work. I wouldn't trust any work done by the first person now.
 
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Old 05-04-09, 02:43 PM
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The two individual breakers are probably both on the same buss in the panel. Translation- they are both on the same phase meaning that each will show 120v to ground or nuetral but will not have 240v between them. Two individual breakers are not allowed. So, the first problem is you need a single 2 pole breaker. Next, look on the data plate of the new range to see what it says for total wattage. IF it is under 12,000 watts, you are permiited to wire the range to an 8000 watt circuit which means you can use #8 cable and a 40 amp breaker. IF it is 12,000 watts or more, you must use #6 cable and a 50 amp circuit breaker. Frankly, I would just put in a #6 cable with a 50 amp breaker and be done with it.The next thing is you'll have to do replace the 3-wire cable with a 4 wire cable. It is no longer permitted to use a 3 wire cable for electric ranges. You have to use a 4 wire cable with 2 hots, an insulated neutral and a ground wire. Also, the cordset has to be 4 wire, the receptacle has to be 4 prong and, if the is receptacle behind the range, it has to be situated so that you can pull out the bottom drawer and unplug it. I agree with the others, DO NOT let this person wire anything else in your house. From the electrical standpoint, the kitchen is the most complex room in the house with lots of rules. I hope your guy followed them.
 
 

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