induction cooktop wiring amperage limits

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Old 10-28-10, 02:24 PM
C
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induction cooktop wiring amperage limits

Hi there,

we've recently purchased a new induction cooktop, the Fagor IFF 82R. Out of the box it's electrical connection is presented as bare wires (not a male plug), with an earth and then a pair of a pair of wires, i.e. 2 neutral and 2 live wires twisted together. The documentation says it will/can draw 32A at 240V.

My question is can i simply buy the male plug and plug it into a standard outlet, assuming i have a 32 Amp fuse on that circuit, or should we be getting new wires run to it by an electrician ? Is it ok to run 32 Amps through the standard plugs i can buy at the hardware store ?(how strict is the '16 amps' they have written on them) I'm renting and i don't no anything about the type of wiring in the house, although it is all brand new.

sorry if these seem like dumb questions

cheers,

-i
 
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Old 10-28-10, 03:26 PM
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You have what is called a hard wire connection and it will require a junction box and flex connection to your existing box. You cannot connect this cook top to a 16 amp outlet or circuit. Breaker and wire must be rated according to the new cooktop
Is this taking the place of a Range?
If so you should have enough power in your current service to the range... if not you will need a new branch circuit installed to this new cooktop location.
 
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Old 10-28-10, 03:29 PM
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Post deleted. Didn't notice it was non-North American.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-28-10 at 04:56 PM.
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Old 10-28-10, 04:37 PM
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First off this is mostly a USA site and electrical connections vary from country to country. Second, most areas of the US do not allow you to do your own wiring if your renting. You should check with your landlord/super if this is allowed in France.

We have a guy from France here, I'm sure he will be around shortly.
 
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Old 10-28-10, 07:40 PM
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Thanks guys for sending me over here.,


OK let get to the matter In France we are pretty strict with the numbers of circuit and CU { Customer unit } size as well.

Before you do anything more with electrical system please talk to your landlord first and I am sure they will have to get a electrician to come out and deal with it

And The electrician will have to add a new 32 amp circuit plus local disconnect switch as well per French electrical codes.


Merci.
Marc

P.S. if you want to reply this in French let me know I will translated it.
 
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Old 10-29-10, 02:57 AM
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ah ok cool. merci beaucoup everyone involved, we'll call the rental mob and get the pros involved.

cheers !
 
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