Tips/tricks for removing built-in Dishwasher

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Old 02-27-12, 07:00 AM
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Tips/tricks for removing built-in Dishwasher

I just purchased (will be picked up next week) a Bosch dishwasher to replace our old one. It looks like a fairly easy task but I thought I would see if there are any tips or tricks that may make this an easier task.

Is there anything I should watch for or do to make this easier or just simply dive right in?
 
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Old 02-27-12, 06:46 PM
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have a bunch of towels close by.
 
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Old 02-28-12, 06:03 AM
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Originally Posted by condo-owner
have a bunch of towels close by.
Good to know (and was planned).
90% of my house (excluding the unfinished basement) is hardwood, even in the basement.
I'll keep the shop vac close by as well if there is any excess water.
 
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Old 02-28-12, 06:16 AM
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Dishwashers are pretty standard and easy. Turn off the power and shut off the water supply and bleed the pressure from the pipes if there is not a dedicated shutoff for the dishwasher. If you open the door of your old dishwasher there should be a couple screws at the top that attach it to the bottom of the counter. Disconnect the power and water lines and slide it out. If it seems wedged in place try screwing in (make the dishwasher shorter) the leveling feet. The worst case scenario is if the kitchen floor has been sheeted or overlaid which can trap the dishwasher in it's pocket.
 
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Old 02-28-12, 06:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Pilot Dane
Dishwashers are pretty standard and easy. Turn off the power and shut off the water supply and bleed the pressure from the pipes if there is not a dedicated shutoff for the dishwasher. If you open the door of your old dishwasher there should be a couple screws at the top that attach it to the bottom of the counter. Disconnect the power and water lines and slide it out. If it seems wedged in place try screwing in (make the dishwasher shorter) the leveling feet. The worst case scenario is if the kitchen floor has been sheeted or overlaid which can trap the dishwasher in it's pocket.
Thank you. I figured it was pretty straight forward. Having a quick over view from someone that has done it really does help though.
If time (and my kids) permit, I'll end this thread with a quick photo dump of the items I had to disconnect/remove. This will give the next DIY person a visual idea what they are in for.
 
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Old 02-28-12, 08:43 AM
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My worse case scenario was having to cut one out with a Sawzall. As Pilot Dane mentioned there was entrapment. The customer had just had a new ceramic tile floor installed. The dishwasher installer wanted to bust up the new floor to get the old dishwasher out. I said I'd give it a try. It was a very old dishwasher taller then a modern dishwasher. I suspect new modern height cabinets at some point had been installed. At that time the leveling feet had been removed to get it to fit under the cabinet so screwing in the leveling feet was not an option. I actually had to block up the main part of the dishwasher and cut the lower part off.

Installation tip: On the above example before I put the new one in I tiled under the cabinet with left over tile scraps the the floor installer had left. Most weren't whole pieces but that didn't matter because they weren't going to show. The important point was the new dishwasher could easily be slid out.
 
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Old 02-28-12, 09:15 AM
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Leave yourself plenty of wire for the electrical and tubing for the water. Mine had a junction box behind the DW...but only had about 2 ft of wire to connect to the DW. I pulled that and put in 4ft from the J box.

I also used a 6ft SS flex line from under the sink to the DW connection. Junked the coil of copper tubing that was used prior. Makes it a lot easier to be able to connect everything then slide the DW in to place. Instead of sliding it in and working though just the toekick area. Helps to have someone there to help feed the lines back when sliding it in.

Also... to protect the flooring, position a piece of cardboard in front of the opening before moving the DW into place.
 
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Old 02-28-12, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047
My worse case scenario was having to cut one out with a Sawzall. As Pilot Dane mentioned there was entrapment. The customer had just had a new ceramic tile floor installed. The dishwasher installer wanted to bust up the new floor to get the old dishwasher out. I said I'd give it a try. It was a very old dishwasher taller then a modern dishwasher. I suspect new modern height cabinets at some point had been installed. At that time the leveling feet had been removed to get it to fit under the cabinet so screwing in the leveling feet was not an option. I actually had to block up the main part of the dishwasher and cut the lower part off.

Installation tip: On the above example before I put the new one in I tiled under the cabinet with left over tile scraps the the floor installer had left. Most weren't whole pieces but that didn't matter because they weren't going to show. The important point was the new dishwasher could easily be slid out.
Thanks for the insight. I don't think I'll run into your worst case as the flooring under the dishwasher (and cabinets) is the same hardwood that is the flooring in the room. There is a piece of wood that is mounted along the front edge of the cabinets that might create a lip to fight with, but I believe it should be easily removed if it comes down to it (I think it's nailed down with the old 1930's square nails only).
The old dishwasher doesn't look to be too old (under 10 years maybe), so hopefully hight isn't an issue. I'll keep your tip in mind for sure when it comes to leveling however.
 
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Old 02-28-12, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45
Leave yourself plenty of wire for the electrical and tubing for the water. Mine had a junction box behind the DW...but only had about 2 ft of wire to connect to the DW. I pulled that and put in 4ft from the J box.

I also used a 6ft SS flex line from under the sink to the DW connection. Junked the coil of copper tubing that was used prior. Makes it a lot easier to be able to connect everything then slide the DW in to place. Instead of sliding it in and working though just the toekick area. Helps to have someone there to help feed the lines back when sliding it in.

Also... to protect the flooring, position a piece of cardboard in front of the opening before moving the DW into place.
I'll watch for the electrical and as you did, add to it if needed. I have some spare junction boxes and wire from when I did work in the garage at the other house.
As for the water, I can see that they used some sort of steal braided flex line as it comes through the floor into the ceiling in the basement (the basement is unfinished). I don't know how much flex line is there, so hopefully I don't have to replace it with a longer piece. I might disconnect the flex line in the basement ceiling (letting all the water drain down into a bucket), then tie a rope/strink to it. This way if it is short, I can use to fishline to pull it back through the hole and reconnect it.

I think by reading over your suggestions, I might have found a good trick for keeping the water mess limited. Thanks
 
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Old 03-02-12, 07:27 AM
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So I'll be picking up the new washer Monday (the truck comes in tomorrow, but with the snow they are calling for tonight and tomorrow, I'll wait until I go to work on Monday to get it).

Anyway, I looked at the old unit, and it appears pretty straight forward and probably will be easier to do the uninstall/install then it will be to get the old one out of the house and the new one in (wife is pregnent, so it's just me moving heavy stuff).

Anyway, here is what I have to play with.

The old unit


The top (under counter) brackets


The leveling legs I need raise


The water feed comes through the floor from the basement. You can see in the picture below the shut off valve and the theaded connection. For my unit, I'll shut it off here and disconnect/drain the feed line from here (unfinished basement, so some water on the floor if I can't hit the bucket is a non-issue).
I suspect the feed line is short, so I'll attach a string to the end which will allow me to feed it back through the hole when installing the new one.


This is under the dishwasher where I believe the drain hose connects. It's physically lower then where it connects to the drain, so once I pull the unit out from under the counter, I'll pop it off and into a bucket.


I do not see where the power is connected without pulling out the unit, so I guess I'll be flipping brakers until I find it's power. I'm assuming it's connected through the back of the unit.

I'll have more pics when I do the actual swap. This should give anyone looking to do this job a bit of a visual idea what they are in for.
 
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Old 03-02-12, 07:58 AM
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Disconnect your power at the connection box lower right of last picture and pull out of the box before trying to remove.
 
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Old 03-02-12, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047
Disconnect your power at the connection box lower right of last picture and pull out of the box before trying to remove.
I didn't even notice that.
I didn't get a whole lot of time to look and snap photos. My 2 boys where demanding their daddy time (2yrs old and 10months).
 
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Old 03-12-12, 06:27 AM
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So the new dishwasher is in.

Here are the last few reference pics for anyone interested.

Turned off the braker for the dishwasher and disconnected the drain hose from the tee under the sink. Disconnected the power which was hardwired into the box in the front right of the dishwasher (was in this location on both the old and new unit. With a little bit of wiggling it rolled straight out.

This is what I fould after removing the dishwasher (be sure to have a vacume handy to clean out all the dust and what not that had accumulated behind the old one).

The drain hose ran through the gap on the right hand side.

The person that did the install of the previous dishwasher did not leave much of a leash on the power, so I ended up replacing the cable with a slightly longer one (same type of wire).

Moving the dishwasher back in was slow, as I would move it a few inches, then pull the slack on the drain and feed hoses. The power cable was connected to the new washer once it was ~3/4 the way into the spot. A small arm is useful for this as you'll need to reach under the dishwasher to pull the cable forward. Once it was connected, it was a slow push in, pull hoses, and finally in.
The leveling feet also required a small arm as this unit had one in the back (middle) which needed to be lengthened a bit. Lengthened the front ones a bit and installed to top screws to the counter top.
Once everything was in place (and with the kick plate still removed), I had my wife turn on the water feed. Checked for leaks (all was good). I used t-clamps instead of the provided pinch clamps as the provided ones where not cheap (potential leaks) and I happen to have some that fit. They are a bit over kill, but they worked great.
Once the water was turned on and confirmed no leaks, on went the power (no sparks or anything, which is always good).
Ran the unit through a quick wash with no dishes just to clean it out and get everything moving. Was also able to check the drain hook ups for leaks.

The unit I installed was one of the Bosch slient series which is not as quiet as the old one (suppose to be quiet), but does very well with our well water, so life is good.

The installed unit
 
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Old 03-12-12, 07:20 AM
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Did you install a wire clamp on the dishwashers electrical box? A couple years ago I got a complaint about a Bosch dishwasher smoking and then it went dead. I pulled off the toe kick plate and saw that no clamp was used. They just ran the wire into the box and made the connection. Apparently a few years of vibrations when the dishwasher ran was enough for the sharp metal of the box to cut through the insulation the wire causing it to short out. It burnt the wire a bit before the circuit breaker tripped.


 
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Old 03-12-12, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Pilot Dane
Did you install a wire clamp on the dishwashers electrical box? A couple years ago I got a complaint about a Bosch dishwasher smoking and then it went dead. I pulled off the toe kick plate and saw that no clamp was used. They just ran the wire into the box and made the connection. Apparently a few years of vibrations when the dishwasher ran was enough for the sharp metal of the box to cut through the insulation the wire causing it to short out. It burnt the wire a bit before the circuit breaker tripped.
Oh yes, forgot to mention all the extras I used for this install.

The supplied materials that came with the washer had what looked like a 2cent clamp. After confirming the hole in the back of the wiring box was standard size, I tossed the suplied one and used a proper clamp that looks to be the same as what you pictured.
Being the son of a licensed electrician, I have a ton of connectors, wingnuts, you name it.

I should also mention I used teflon tape on all threaded water connections (not supplied in the spare parts bag).

One thing to note with the Bosch washers (at least this one), the water inlet connection is on the front of the washer, facing forward (towards the kick plate). I can't understand why they would aim it that way. In the instructions, it also suggests installing a 90' connection here (which I didn't have and had to hit up my local hardware store for).
I also replaced the steel braided water supply line, which I believe should be replaced every 5 or so years.
 
 

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