Can't disconnect water line for washer

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Old 04-22-13, 07:16 AM
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Can't disconnect water line for washer

I'm sorry if I posted this in the wrong place...

I'm replacing the hoses to my washing machine. Got the hot water off no prob.mthe cold water is on there so tight I can't remove it. I'm afraid I'm going to strip it or worse break the fixture it's plugged into. Any advice?

Thanks!
 
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Old 04-22-13, 07:55 AM
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Is it the washer side or the fauset side you are having issues with?
I'm a huge fan of pbblaster. Give it a good go of that, let it sit, then use a pair of vice grips on one end and a pipe wrench on the other with the two close together, squeeze them towards each other. This should make it easy to break the seal without breaking something.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 09:07 AM
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If it's stuck at the washer end you'll want to be careful not to squeeze the fitting too tightly as most of the inlet valves are plastic.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 09:16 AM
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If it's stuck at the washer end you'll want to be careful not to squeeze the fitting too tightly as most of the inlet valves are plastic.
Good call, I forgot to mention this.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 09:21 AM
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Thanks. Forgot to mention its not the washer side, it's the faucet side. And you're right, the washer side is plastic.
Pbblaster huh? Never heard of it. Ok will hit the hardware store. Also don't own a pair of vice grips or a pipe wrench ... And should add that I just broke the wrench I do have trying to do this job!!

Ok, I'll have to hit the hardware store and try out your advice. Thanks!
 
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Old 04-22-13, 09:32 AM
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PBBlaster is a staple in my tool chest. I've used it to removed exhaust bolts without having to apply heat.

On topic, I was thinking of suggesting WD-40 which is a Water Displacement agent, but I'm not sure if it'll do the job.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 11:38 AM
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Ok I've gotta get some of that stuff. Oh yea, i tried WD-40 a couple of times over 24 hrs to no avail.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 11:46 AM
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WD40 is not really an oil. It is a water displacer. (Their 40th and most successful Water Displacement formula.)

I'd use waterpump pliers or a pipe wrench.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 12:09 PM
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WOW! Never knew that. Water displacer sounds so much less sophisticated. I envisioned it breakdown down correded materials like acid or something. Very cool to know.

Ok will put waterpipe pliers, pipe wrench on the list for the HW store.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 01:15 PM
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WD40 is not really an oil. It is a water displacer. (Their 40th and most successful Water Displacement formula.)

I'd use waterpump pliers or a pipe wrench.
Water Displacement... Water hose... Was a dumb Monday thought.
Held off suggesting it originally because I know PB works.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 03:11 PM
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you can use a hacksaw blade to cut through the sleeve of the hose. may have to cut 2 places to get it off.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 08:45 AM
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you can use a hacksaw blade to cut through the sleeve of the hose. may have to cut 2 places to get it off.
Although I would consider this a last resort, it would work.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 01:38 PM
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Ok so now's the time to ask, "time to call the plumber"?

I think its called "too much torque" maybe?

First, a picture of the wrench I broke yesterday:



No big deal. Off to the store today today some new wrenches and PB Blaster.

First sprayed it with PB Blaster and let sit for a few mins.
Then using a new vice wrench and another new wrench in opposite directions, it seemed like it came loose!
That is, until, I got the hose off and water started spraying everywhere!
I checked to make sure I had the valve closed and it was.

So looks like I broke the faucet at the threads:

Good one is on the left. One I just broke is on the right:



A closeup



Had to turn off the water main!

Only reason I havent called a plumber yet is I'm hoping on the outside chance I can fix this myself...before the wife gets home.
Or even slimmer it looks like there's a thread on this thing that, maybe I can thread a piece on the outside?

Uh oh.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 01:47 PM
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check that. i confirmed the fixture itself is broken. when closed it still shoots water out when i turn the main back on. will be calling plumber now.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 02:24 PM
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Update: while calling plumbers to find out their emergency fees and timing I tried something...I simply re-attached the hose, with the broken piece still inside, to the faucet. It seemed to fit nice and tight. I turned on the water main and...no leaking! Wow. I have the other end of the hose sticking in the sink drain just in case. but this means no emergency fee or late hour visit by the plumber and I can schedule a normal appt tomorrow. that is....unless...I can fix this myself :-)

Here's what the fixture looks like after I broke away part of the plastic box - originally I thought I could just remove this piece. But after a closer look it appears the faucet is attached to the threaded piece permanently.



And further down you can see the threaded piece is soldered to the cold water pipe

 
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Old 04-23-13, 10:59 PM
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You know....that sure looks like a seam in the valve. Does the top valve come off the water line. Looks like a set of flats for a wrench on the bottom piece.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 06:07 AM
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PJmax, I don't know. But I too was thinking maybe I could remove it. I gave a couple tries and then decided I've done enough damage :-)
 
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Old 04-24-13, 06:38 AM
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I'm always chaising PJmax's posts....
Looking at the pictures, I agree with PJmax's thoughts.
Take a look at the valve and see if there is a seam between it and the lower "nut" as indicated in PJmax's photo. if so, pbblast the seam, allow to sit for ~20 minutes, and try removing, using a wrench on both the valve body and the lower nut. Be sure not to apply stress to the lower threaded section as you don't want to break the solder.
Be patient and if it doesn't come off easy, pbblast again, go watch a show and try again.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 08:51 AM
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Just a minor annoyance and probably only annoys me but the broken tool in your picture is a pair of pliers not a wrench.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 11:47 AM
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Turn your water off again and remove the hose. Look in the part that is stuck in the hose, the part that should stay with the valve, and see if it has a hexagon shaped hole. If it does then take it to a tool store or tool rental store and find an Allen (hexagonal) wrench to fit. Use a good pair of Channellock pliers on the hose connection and back out the valve piece. Replace that valve piece in the valve and turn the water on.

Next time use a bit of plumber's grease or silicone grease on the threads of the hose connection to prevent it from seizing on the threads.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 12:10 PM
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Furd,
I've always used teflon tape. Not sure if this is right or wrong. Your thoughts?
 
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Old 04-24-13, 07:04 PM
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Teflon tape isn't exactly wrong but it IS unsightly and harder to remove when you disconnect the hose. It also has the tendency to shred as you screw the connection together and the little shreds can plug strainer screens in the hose or foul up the solenoid-actuated fill valve. Teflon paste overcomes the shredding problem but unless very carefully applied and cleaned is still unsightly.

Remember, the sealing of the connection is NOT via the threads but the washer (or sometimes an O-ring) in the hose connector. It is NOT necessary to tighten the hose connection more than hand tight or just a bit more than hand tight. Just use a couple of SMALL dabs of the silicone plumber's grease applied at a couple of points around the male thread and then wipe off any excess with a rag after the connection is secured.
 
 

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