Tight Fit Dryer Vent Consideration


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Old 02-03-14, 04:15 PM
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Tight Fit Dryer Vent Consideration

My washer and dryer are inside of an exterior "closet" recessed into my car port. Washer on the left and dryer on the right.

Due to the space behind the dryer is tight, if I want to be able to close this closet door completely, the back face of the dryer would end up being 3.5" from the back wall. Which means I can't fit a standard 4" duct + elbow there.

I am thinking of using one of these "tight fit" contraptions, basically a rectangular channel to go behind the dryer then connect to the standard circular duct.

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#1. Do these tight fit vent work? Will you end up with much more lint trapped in these rectangular channels and corners?

#2. The way mine will work is I need to attach to the back of the dryer, then this channel will go behind the washer to it's left, all the way across the back of the washer before attaching to the circular duct. What I am worried about is if someone is not aware of this attachment in the back of the dryer, and proceed to pull the dryer forward - for whatever reason - they will end up bending this vent because part of it is behind the washer. I can't think of a way around this.

#3. When I connect the circular duct to it, should I go horizontally shortest path to the outside wall to vent, or should I angle it up and go higher so I can vent it at a higher spot? Right now if I go horizontal the vent would be 18" off the ground.
 
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Old 02-05-14, 02:15 AM
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I've had one of those vents for many years with zero issues. I do make a point to clean it every couple of years, but it never had much lint buildup at all. And I've damaged it before by pulling dryer out..something to watch out for as it bends quite easily.
 
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Old 02-05-14, 03:44 AM
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Old 02-05-14, 07:55 AM
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Can't some dryers be rerouted out the side?
 
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Old 02-06-14, 08:10 AM
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#1. Do these tight fit vent work? Will you end up with much more lint trapped in these rectangular channels and corners?

#2. What I am worried about is if someone is not aware of this attachment in the back of the dryer, and proceed to pull the dryer forward - for whatever reason - they will end up bending this vent because part of it is behind the washer. I can't think of a way around this.

#3. When I connect the circular duct to it, should I go horizontally shortest path to the outside wall to vent, or should I angle it up and go higher so I can vent it at a higher spot? Right now if I go horizontal the vent would be 18" off the ground.
1) I was forced to use an oval one instead of a flat one (limited selection and I didn't want to wait for shipping), but I have had no problems at all.

2) The only solution I can come up with is; Remove washer and dryer, install this vent against the wall, spend a long time securing this to the wall with wires and screws, etc., connect dryer (somewhat loosely; no screws or metal tape) to vent, install washer. When dryer is pulled away, the vent will stay behind. This may prevent the vent from being damaged, but will still force you or someone else to remove the washer before hooking up the dryer again.

3) I know of no reason to make things harder and go higher. But others here have more knowledge than I.

As Ray2047 points out, there are other ways to run things. If you could provide us with a sketch of your physical constraints and where the outside wall is, perhaps someone can come up with a more elegant solution.
 
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Old 02-06-14, 08:40 AM
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Interesting but not encouraging read if you decide to go to side vent. Side venting the clothes dryer: many lessons learned

I also have seen a dryer vent box. Basically a way to put a 1 foot wide by 2 foot tall 3 inch deep alcove into the wall to give more room for a standard round duct.
 
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Old 02-06-14, 08:50 AM
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Interesting but not encouraging read if you decide to go to side vent. Side venting the clothes dryer: many lessons learned
From what I get from the OP, the vent to the outside is a good three feet away and along the back wall. If that's the case, side venting will not accomplish anything. Depending on the layout, though, perhaps the vent to the outside can be moved and the ducting can be shortened or even put in the wall.

I converted my dryer to side vent using the rigid metal bendable ducting. It was inexpensive and very easy, as I simply had to open up a small access panel in the back and get a little creative with screwdriver angles.
 
 

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