Dishwasher drain

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-30-14, 08:48 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: usa
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Dishwasher drain

My dishwasher drain line going to the garbage disposal is long and has a loop in it. The tube starts out low at the dishwasher and rise up about a foot and a half to where it goes into the garbage disposal. The wife says she smells something coming from the kitchen drain and she possible sees something in the tube close to where it loops. The dishwasher was installed by company where I bought it and works fine but now it smells and has water on the bottom tray sometimes. Any idea of the possible problem.
Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-30-14, 09:08 AM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,893
Received 25 Votes on 23 Posts
The loop needs to be higher... ( Note: Some newer dishwashers have the loop built into the side of the dishwasher already)

[ATTACH=CONFIG]37387[/ATTACH]
 
Attached Images  
  #3  
Old 08-30-14, 09:30 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: usa
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The loop is on the floor of the cabinet not anywhere close to the diagram. The service man is coming out to look at it due to it still being under warranty. I take it that the dishwasher will push the water enough to go up to loop and then to drain.
 
  #4  
Old 08-30-14, 10:07 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 53,582
Received 416 Votes on 389 Posts
Yes....the dishwasher has plenty of power to push the water up thru the drain line even with it fastened up high.

If you have the installation booklet that came with the washer it should show that drain hose attachment or make mention of a vacuum break.
 
  #5  
Old 08-30-14, 11:35 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This question comes up a lot.

A high loop may be fine in some areas. In CA, an Air Gap is required by code.

Name:  Dishwasher%20air%20gap%20installation.gif
Views: 4445
Size:  10.1 KB

A dishwasher drain hose end is 7/8" ID. It can be trimmed back to 5/8 ID.
The 5/8 fitting will go to the 5/8 inlet on air gap.
The outlet arm of the air gap is 7/8". This will go to disposal inlet, or a 7/8" branch tailpiece.
(make sure to knock out factory seal on disposal or you will have a flood, rather than water discharging into disposal, it will come out of air gap at counter)
 
  #6  
Old 08-30-14, 11:45 AM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,893
Received 25 Votes on 23 Posts
In CA, an Air Gap is required by code.

The OP is from Ohio...
 
  #7  
Old 08-30-14, 12:15 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Air gaps are required by many plumbing codes (UPC - Uniform Plumbing Code is one) for dishwashers and for water softeners.

If it isn't a nationwide standard, it will probably become one soon. Air gap does a better job than loop in ensuring waste water from sink is not siphoned into dishwasher.
 
  #8  
Old 08-30-14, 12:34 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,893
Received 25 Votes on 23 Posts
Our plumbing code air gaps went out with the horse and buggie. They have not been required for years..

Ill have to check the UPC code because I thought it was all code now that no air gaps needed.

If you can quote that section from the UPC that would be great..
 
  #9  
Old 08-30-14, 01:08 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK Mike,
UPC 807.4
IRC Section P2717.1

But that said, let's just leave it for CA. I got a headache from looking at those notes.

I didn't mean to sound authoritative in my explanation. The chances of waste water backing into any dishwasher is slim. And as mentioned, many newer dishwashers have a built in loop.
CA has a rule for everything.
 
  #10  
Old 08-30-14, 01:21 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,893
Received 25 Votes on 23 Posts
Thats a stupid code IMO... But its probably left there for the homeowners benefit. As you see from the OP's issue the installer could not even get it right...

Here is the UPC code...

http://www.iapmo.org/UPC%20Report%20...apter%2008.pdf

We follow the national standard plumbing code.. Just NJ and maryland I believe...


I didn't mean to sound authoritative in my explanation.
I got a headache from looking at those notes.



No not at all.. I just did not feel like looking up the code and my trick to get you to find it worked...
 
  #11  
Old 08-30-14, 01:33 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You're OK man.
Some of these codes don't make sense. I'm at the mercy of an inspector. Sometimes I feel like they have to find something just to make things interesting.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: