LG Dishwasher won't completely drain


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Old 04-03-17, 05:43 PM
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Unhappy LG Dishwasher won't completely drain

Hello all-
Came home today to find that my approx. 10 yr. old LG dishwasher still had about 2" of murky water in the bottom of the tub, dripping out onto our hardwood floor. Pretty sure I save the floor, but I have no idea how to proceed. I vacuumed out the remaining water, and checked the troubleshooting guide in the manual. It says that if water remains after completion of cycle, check the drainage hose for kinks or blockages. So, a) why only that much water left in the tub if all the rest managed to be pumped out if the drain hose has issues, and b) wouldn't the pump be the more likely culprit? Pulling the unit out of the cabinet is not a big project, but with bamboo floors, precautions must be taken, and I'm alone in this.

Dunno if I should bite the bullet and call for service ($$$) or yank it out and see if the hose is, well, hosed. Would appreciate any advice anyone can lend to run this down. TIA!
 
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Old 04-03-17, 06:32 PM
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Most dishwashers use a corrugated hose which gets crap clogged in it. So you could have a hose issue.

One very important item for dishwasher drain lines is they need to be run all the up the bottom of the countertop and then down to the drain.

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Old 04-03-17, 07:15 PM
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Right, that's probably the first thing I'll check out. It's just a pain pulling it out of the cabinet onto hardwood floors, but I guess there's no getting around it. Thanks for that diagram.

Actually, mine has two hoses that appear to be attached to the aerator, a black one that goes to the disposal, and the other corrugated one the runs back into the cabinet that holds the dishwasher. I'm assuming the corrugated hose drains the washer and the black one runs any solids to the disposal. I'm not tackling this until the weekend. What a PITA.
 

Last edited by jhansman; 04-03-17 at 07:31 PM.
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Old 04-03-17, 07:26 PM
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You may have to run the two front adjustable feet up.

I carry a wool style blanket that I use to slide the units out on.
Cardboard..... like from an appliance.... works good too.
 
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Old 04-03-17, 07:34 PM
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Being in Cal, you probably have an air gap on the sink deck. The dishwasher 5/8" ID drain hose will go up to the air gap and down to the disposer with a 7/8" ID hose.
If this is the case, ensure the 7/8" hose has no dips and is not clogged due to dips.
An incorrectly installed 7/8" hose is the most common mistake I see in installing a DW.
 
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Old 04-03-17, 08:34 PM
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PJMax-Yeah, we have some pieces of fiberboard specifically for moving the appliances that are, of course, all on the hardwood. I like the blanket idea.

Handyone- You are correct on the setup, and the 7/8" black hose that runs to the disposal is only about 8" long. I'll check it first, just in case it may have blockage. Some fun....
 
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Old 04-08-17, 04:29 PM
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Unhappy Update

OK, just an update for those of you who took time to reply. I disconnected the drain hose from the aerator at the sink and blew into it, just to see if air would move through it. No luck, but I figured it may be blocked by a shut off valve at the point where it connects to the pump; no blockage in the hose from the aerator to the disposal. Then the wife and I (I know!) took the insides out, using videos we found on YT. One tip: ALWAYS photograph each step and not screw locations and lengths! Seems like a no-brainer, but it took us much longer to reassemble all the parts. We did it, though, and cleaned every part we could take out. There was debris, but nothing major, just specks of white crap clinging to just about everything. We can't figure out what it is.

Now, here's the weird part: when we run just a quick rinse cycle, it goes through the entire routine, and the first time it finished, it left some (perhaps an inch) of water in the tub when it was done; nothing that would leak out on to the floor. Then we ran the same cycle again. Instead of starting with a rinse, it began by pumping out the excess water left behind the first time; you could hear and see it going into the sink. So, we let it run, and when if finished, it left more water behind when it was done, about as much as we found when I originally posted here. Ran it a third time, and it pumped water at the start again. So, I'm confused. Why does it know to rid itself of remaining water at the start of the cycle, but leave water behind each time? Any ideas would be most welcome. TIA.

BTW, have not pulled the machine out of the cabinet to yank the drain hose, as doing so is a real PITA job, all in all. We were hoping what we did would do the trick, but alas. I'm about ready to call our local Mr. Fixit, a guy I used for years for jobs to big for me. I just wanted to hear back from anyone here first.
 
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Old 04-08-17, 05:19 PM
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Why does it know to rid itself of remaining water at the start of the cycle, but leave water behind each time?
I'm an installer, not a tech. The DW will not let itself flood AFAIK. For example if you forget to knock out the disposer inlet plug, some dishwashers will simply not drain. Others would flood the floor badly. You say there's no blockage.

Does the drain hose enter the very back bottom of the sink base cabinet? It's important the hose enters the cabinet as low as possible and then go straight up. That allows the hose to empty as much as possible and let air in.

The instructions call it the target area and notice how they point out the importance:

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Old 04-08-17, 07:51 PM
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Brian-
Yes, the drain hose enters the sink cabinet at the bottom, (the "target area" in your attached diagram) then up to the aerator, where it deposits the waste water over to the hose that goes to the disposal (which I installed years ago and made sure I took out the knockout plug). So, all is as it should be in that regard. I cannot say for certain there is no blockage in the corrugated drain hose, but I can say that it definitely delivers waste water to the main sink drain via the disposal. This machine has been working fine almost daily for years now, and all of a sudden it won't pump the last of the waste water. One way or the other, I'm going to get to the bottom of this, but in the meantime we're hand washing all our dishes. Feels like the 50s again...
 
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Old 04-08-17, 08:14 PM
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If the drain hose is installed properly, I would say it's a mechanical problem.
It might be worth your time to pull the unit out and make sure the hose is not kinked. It's a pain but will let you see if the thing was just crammed into the space or installed properly.
 
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Old 04-10-17, 03:37 PM
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Yeah, I considered that, but the mounting brackets that came with the machine (crappiest design you can imagine) have been a bloody nightmare since day one. I don't want to pull the machine only to find that the hose is fine and then have to wrestle the washer back into the cabinet and fight with re-attaching it to the cabinet (3/4" veneered plywood). If it comes out, it'll have to stay out until it can be repaired by someone more knowledgeable than I. I suspect the problem is mechanical as well; I was surprised to find a video of how to replace the entire drain, sump, pump, etc., all as one piece, that looked surprisingly easy. Of course, you have to pull the entire unit out, tip it over, etc. No way am I getting out of this for under hundreds of dollars.
 
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Old 04-10-17, 03:53 PM
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Pete, PJmax is the repair guru. At ten years old though I'd consider replacing it, it depends on the condition.
If it has a stainless tub and still looks good it might be worth keeping.
 
 

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