Connecting dishwasher to braided water hose

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Old 05-21-17, 12:02 PM
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Connecting dishwasher to braided water hose

My dad recently replaced his dishwasher with a new one but didn't keep the old hose connections. Right now, the old one doesn't have the ability to be able to screw on the braided hose that is preferable for a dishwasher. If you look at the pics at the URL below, you will see the inlet hose just pushes on to what I'd describe as a "ribbed nipple". It's secure, but the other end has a back rubber piece on the end (as shown in one of the pics). This won't work of course because we need to connect to a standard metal shutoff valve.

When I looked at the install manual, I did see an option to use a copper elbow that would allow me to screw on a braided hose, but I just don't see how I can convert the plastic "ribbed nipple" to a copper fitting. Is this feasible?

I did see this on GE's website, which makes me think it is:

GE Appliances Product Search Results


Here's the URL for the pics:

DISHWASHER by hikerguy1 | Photobucket

The model# of the dishwasher is GDF610PGJ2WW.
 
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Old 05-21-17, 12:29 PM
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I don't recognize the parts you show in the pictures. (The water supply is at the front left on all dishwashers)
However you need a 'new style dishwasher elbow', if you don't have one.

Here's a link:
BrassCraft 3/4 in. Female Hose Thread Swivel Nut x 1/2 in. O.D. Compression Dishwasher Elbow with Hose Washer-HES-8-12X - The Home Depot

Ensure the washer is in the garden hose thread part and tighten hand tight plus 3/4 turn with pliers.
The supply line is hand tight plus 1/4 turn only, overtight will leak.
 

Last edited by Handyone; 05-21-17 at 12:41 PM. Reason: supply
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Old 05-21-17, 01:51 PM
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That is the fill valve and it does require the fitting that Brian linked to.

Go back to your selling dealer and shame him for the fitting.
MOST will give them to you with a new dishwasher appliance purchase.

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Old 05-21-17, 03:07 PM
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Thanks for the info handyone. So what the heck do I have that one piece pushed onto? lol It sure looked like an inlet. I swear I looked under the dishwasher at least three times and didn't see anything that looked like a threaded part. I'll have to look again when I go back to his house. He bought it at Lowes, so hopefully they'll give him the part.

Could that one piece that had the rubber boot on it
be used to extend the drain hose itself? Now that I think about it, I think I did see something about that in the manual.

Thanks for advice PJMax.
 
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Old 05-22-17, 07:56 AM
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I think I understand you. The black rubber end is the drain hose, you slid it over the inlet valve (and that's why you can't find it )
The drain hose rubber end goes into the sink base cabinet and is connected to a garbage disposal, or air gap, or branch tailpiece.
The rubber end is 7/8" ID, but can be trimmed down to the 5/8" ID mark if needed.

The barbed end of the dishwasher drain hose connects to a short drain hose located under the unit and is clamped.
Do not try to connect the hoses with the unit standing up, lay it down on it's back and make connections, then stand it up and carefully push it into the opening while feeding the hoses and cord or cable.

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Old 05-22-17, 10:49 AM
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Do not try to connect the hoses with the unit standing up, lay it down on it's back and make connections, then stand it up and carefully push it into the opening while feeding the hoses and cord or cable.
Not sure I understanding the reasoning there.

Dishwashers have the electrical and water connections in the front so that you can connect them with the appliance standing upright. You'd need a lot of extra wiring and water line if you laid the appliance down.
 
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Old 05-22-17, 12:28 PM
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IF you have a cord, it's easier to make all connections first.
If hardwired, you can connect the water line and electrical from the front (standing up), but the drain line connection is further back and there's not much room to get your hands in.

In any case it's easier to connect the drain and water lines, then feed the dishwasher in and connect the wiring.

I've installed units for 17 years and some models will still give me a hard time if you try to work from below, there is very little height.
 
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