Old, funky fridge

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-27-17, 11:46 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2017
Location: United States
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Old, funky fridge

A few years back, I had an apartment with a very, very old fridge--I'm talking 1940's kind of old.

There was a problem with the freezer I'm still trying to figure out: It smelled. I washed it repeatedly with soap and water, with vinegar, etc., but nothing worked. The smell would return and repeatedly food became tainted and had to be tossed. I eventually caved and bought a stand up freezer.

Any idea what the problem was?

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-28-17, 05:06 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,052
Received 533 Votes on 490 Posts
What does it matter if you no longer have the appliance?

The ducting and coil probably needed to be cleaned. On some more modern refrigerators the coils are in the back of the freezer and ducting in the bottom back of the freezer connects to the refrigerator section and are usually covered by a vanity panel. Food particles and spills can collect in those areas and unless you remove the cover/vanity panels you miss those areas when you clean.
 
  #3  
Old 07-28-17, 09:07 AM
V
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: North East Kingdom of Vermont
Posts: 2,533
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Back in the 1940s, my Parents had an IceBox; and the Ice Man visited a couple times a week to deliver a replacement block of Ice.

I don't recall anything ever breaking in the Ice Box . . . . worked perfectly !
 
  #4  
Old 07-28-17, 12:36 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 14
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
@Vermont
There was one part that could break, - the boy who was emptying the drip pan at least daily.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icebox

And you could not store ice cream or frozen pizza in that "funky fridge" for long.

@anita8jp
I've observed this in newer fridges, circa 1990s-early 2000s, - especially during/after defrosting the freezer.
I am also curious what is the source of the smell. I am guessing that it comes from the plastic. But why would it be outgassing?
 
  #5  
Old 07-28-17, 02:14 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 57,771
Received 932 Votes on 869 Posts
A 1940's fridge could have been run on natural gas. The old Servels were that vintage.

When the units defrost... an electric heating element..... not unlike the element in an electric oven... heats the evaporator coil to melt the ice. There is a thermostat to keep the element from overheating but some ran very hot. That could cause an odor too.
 
  #6  
Old 07-28-17, 05:02 PM
V
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: North East Kingdom of Vermont
Posts: 2,533
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Originally Posted by St-Ranger
". . . There was one part that could break, - the boy who was emptying the drip pan at least daily . . ."
True; but I solved that problem at an off-the-grid place I owned 25-40 years ago where we had an IceBox and I ran a " PVC pipe right through the wall to drain the meltwater outside (with a screen so that mice and bugs wouldn't wander into our food stuffs) . . . . probably wouldn't work in the city.

Besides that, you can't count on the Ice Man to deliver any more . . . . he's standing in the unemployment line along with the Buggy Whip makers.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: