Identifying low side refrigerant line.

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Old 04-19-18, 08:10 AM
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Identifying low side refrigerant line.

Hi All, Hopefully I can keep this somewhat non-confusing, so please bear with me. We have a small commercial type beverage cooler, similar to what you would find next to the typical grocery store check-out lane. It's not cooling enough (bottoms out at about 42 degrees) and after confirming the typical parts are functioning.....compressor......fans....coils are clean.....no restrictions......etc. I'm gonna try and shoot a little freon in it to see if it holds. I realize that if it needs gas then it's got a leak, but sometimes they can run quite a while on a simple re-fill. But thats another story. The unit in question here is stickered as requiring R-134 coolant. So my question is what is the best way to identify the low side line as there are 2 Schrader (sp) valves on this unit. There is a "Y" joint (lack of proper term) in one of the lines where there is a single line coming off this "Y" that is about 5 inches long and is capped at the end. There is a schrader valve installed about 2 inches from the capped end. This looks by design to be there for easier access. Could this be the low side line ? Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 
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Old 04-19-18, 09:55 AM
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Sorry

This forum does not allow any discussion of servicing the closed refrigerant system. This policy has been in effect for many years and I doubt it will ever change. Yes, I know that R-134a refrigerant is readily available to anyone with the green to pay for it.
 
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Old 04-19-18, 11:37 AM
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OK...you have me at a dis-advantage. I apologize and i had no clue that discussing refrigerant was a taboo subject in this forum. But i'm confused on your 34 refrigerant comment. You see to suggest that it is illegal and is only available on the black market ?? Thanks.
 
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Old 04-19-18, 01:04 PM
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What I mean is that R-134a is readily available at any auto parts store or even Wal*Mart. It does not come under the EPA rules that require an EPA-issued certificate to even buy the stuff as all other common refrigerants require. That makes any item using R-134a DIY friendly...except that the owners of this forum have made it a policy to not allow discussion of ANY work done on the sealed portion of a refrigeration system.

There ARE many, many sources of information available over the Internet, this forum is just not one of them.

Just because R-134a can be easy bought does NOT mean that most (all?) of the EPA requirements when using refrigerants do not still apply. It still isn't legal to merely discharge R-134a to the atmosphere.
 
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Old 04-19-18, 02:47 PM
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Thank You for the explanation. It was your comment of "yes I know that R-134 refrigerant is readily available to anyone with the green to pay for it" that had me confused.....esp. considering the fact that my only mention of 34 was simply stating that the unit was stickered for it. I find the fact that no "sealed" portion of a refer can be discussed somewhat "interesting" to say the least.... regardless the owner of this forums wishes should be honored. Thanks again,
 
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