Stove outlet/receptacle donít match


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Old 05-23-18, 04:16 PM
V
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Stove outlet/receptacle donít match

Just moved into a new place, came with a new stove, but Iím unable to plug it in (see photos). What would be the easiest way to resolve this?
 
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Old 05-23-18, 04:31 PM
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Looks like someone installed a dryer outlet instead of a range outlet.
I'd change the cord on your range to one that fits the outlet.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-4-ft-...02DS/203497478
 
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Old 05-23-18, 05:57 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

That is a 30A cord and a 50A range receptacle.
The receptacle needs to be changed and the circuit breaker size may need to be reduced too.

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If you're renting.... contact the management.
 
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Old 05-24-18, 02:50 AM
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PJ,

I'm curious, what harm would it be to follow Joe's suggestion to change out the plug rather than the outlet? The cord/appliance is designed to only draw up to 30 amps, while the plug can handle 50 ! Is there cause for concern ?
 
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Old 05-24-18, 01:14 PM
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The wiring in the appliance is rated for 30A maximum. If it's connected to a 50A source that wiring is no longer adequately protected,
 
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Old 05-24-18, 02:12 PM
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The wiring in the appliance is rated for 30A maximum. If it's connected to a 50A source that wiring is no longer adequately protected,
I'm confused. The supply line is rated at 50 amps and therefore theoretically can handle up to 50 amp draw. But the appliance will only draw theoretically a max of 30m amps. The appliance may not be protected but then the circuit is protected???? What am I missing?

Is it not the same as plugging an appliance that draws just a few amps, such a a radio on a 15 amp circuit? Or a light bulb in 20 amp circuit?
 
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Old 05-24-18, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by PJmax
The wiring in the appliance is rated for 30A maximum. If it's connected to a 50A source that wiring is no longer adequately protected,
In my opinion, the important thing is to change the circuit breaker to a 30 amp unit. Once that is done, it doesn't really matter what cord/plug and outlet are used, so long as they are compatible with each other.
 
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Old 05-24-18, 04:01 PM
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I'm not sure what the confusion is here. I posted this in my first reply.
The receptacle needs to be changed and the circuit breaker size may need to be reduced too.

Waiting to hear if this is a rental. This change may need to be handled by an electrician.
The OP needs to have the wiring checked for size. We can assume that since there is a 50A receptacle currently in place that there is a 50A breaker also in place.

Portable appliances are designed to be plugged into 15A or 20A circuits. It doesn't matter what they draw.... their wiring is designed to handle that much current. In many applications that wire size is smaller than it should be but that's not part of this discussion. Usually.... UL rated devices have a proper cord. It's the "other" devices that are lacking.
 
 

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