Water Hook up Plastic threads


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Old 02-27-20, 10:18 AM
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Water Hook up Plastic threads

As noted in another post, I mentioned we got a new Electrolux washer. The clutz who delivered it, went to hook up the water lines, against my better judgement I let him at it. Not surprisingly, he messed up the threads on one of the plastic nipples for the water feeds. The problem is slowly being fixed by the seller and I got a loaner in the interim. Here is my question. Looking on line there are zillions of posts for messed up plastic nipples on washers like these. I don't imagine anyone is going to inspire the washer manufacturers to use brass and add a few bucks to the cost. So here is my question. Does anyone make any sort of thread chaser for this sort of fitting? I am guessing the threads, since they are not really the sealing element for this fitting, could be straightened out unless they are totally messed up. I got to believe a metal chaser, properly designed could save a whole lot of vale assembly replacements due to clutzy hook ups. Anybody ever hear of such a device?
 
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Old 02-27-20, 11:01 AM
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I have always had to replace the water valve when this happens. Sometime I would get lucky and get treads to line up.Hake sure they replace the water valve you do not want any repair on this.
 
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Old 02-27-20, 11:06 AM
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The hose fitting itself is probably the best thread chaser if your can get it started. If the threads are merely pushed out of way a bit threading on a hose should straighten them as much as possible.

If the threads are really buggered the next step might be to get a die and cut new threads. This is commonly done with steel studs & bolts but you've got to be more careful with plastic. I only recommend cleaning up the threads with a die if you think there is enough plastic remaining to form usable threads as the die will cut away plastic to clean up the threads meaning less plastic and less strength. Other than that my other suggestion is to replace that part on your machine so you get fresh, new threads.
 
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Old 02-27-20, 12:41 PM
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This is a longshot, but I wonder if this might work. The link below is to a Melnor Metal Hose Shutoff. It is basically a hose extension with female threads on one end and male threads on the other (with a shutoff valve thrown in). What I was thinking was to put some silicone rubber on the threads on the female end and screwed it onto the plastic nipple as best you can. Let the silicone rubber dry, and then attach your hose to the male end. Obviously, leave the shut off valve in the "open" position.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Melnor-M...395S/203136689
 

Last edited by Bob14525; 02-27-20 at 01:44 PM.
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Old 02-27-20, 03:50 PM
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The type of threads (hose) you are dealing with do not make a watertight connection, The seal is made by compressing the rubber washer in the female fitting as you tighten. If you can't tighten the connection anymore, try adding another rubber washer. Water tight threads are pipe threads that have a taper.
 
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Old 02-27-20, 04:28 PM
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All good ideas. Being, let's say, persuasive, I am getting a new washer, I Refused repair. And being quite unrelenting,, I got a loaner delivered at about 6:30 PM last night. So while I want the $800 unit I paid for, at least no more trips to the laundramat. If I boogered this up, I think I could fix it with a small file and the other ideas posted here. But since the clutz delivery guy did he, seller owns it. Being familiar with taps, dies, and thread chasers, I am thinking a chaser for this hose thread would save the day. I guess a die might work, but I would not want to remove too much thread. In my case I think only the first two or three threads are really messed but the rest have got to be at least a bit out. I messed with it for 10-15 minutes trying to start the metal fitting, but no go. You can see and feel the mess on the first few threads.
 
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Old 03-29-20, 04:32 AM
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FWIW, when I got my new washer, the delivery guy wanted to hook it up. No thanks! After reading posts on the subject, I put some white teflon paste on the plastic threads, no tape. Made the metal hose fitting glide right on. I suppose you could use some liquid soap or something, but unless there is a good reason not to, I would always put some sort of non petroleum lube onto the plastic threads. It really made the fitting slide right on much easier than without any lube. As far as the washer, this Electrolux unit is smooth, quiet, relatively quick wash cycle.
 
 

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