discharge water filter


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Old 05-07-21, 04:58 PM
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discharge water filter

Im considering a Filtrol bag style filtering device to help protect my septic leaching field of non bio fibers and hair. They mentioned most washing machines are limited to 6' in height. My PVC pipe is right there@72". The PVC stand pipe is about16" long before it traps. Will this filter housing withstand a bit of pressure to come off the bottom fitting and then go up to that 72"height. Im not sure how much pressure this filtering device will withstand if any??? does it require to be gravity drained?
 
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Old 05-07-21, 05:02 PM
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Do you have a link to the unit you want to use ?

Something like this...... Filtrol filter ?
 
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Old 05-08-21, 03:34 AM
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And after all these years I have never seen something like this!

Have had septic systems for the past 35 years, never any issues, but never owned those homes for an extended period, I'm going to do some more reading on this!

Only concern that I see, it's a big ugly for the Mr.'s lovely laundry/craft room!!!
 
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Old 05-08-21, 11:16 AM
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I know several people with septic systems. They run their washer discharge thru a nylon stocking into a slop sink. Seems to be very effective and inexpensive.
 
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Old 05-08-21, 12:21 PM
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see the situation here

i dont drain down low to gravity drain here. If I keep the hookup at 72"it will go in the top fine, but as it travels down through the cylinder it will have to push the water through or presureize the cylinder upabout a foot before it turns down to gravity drain into the 72" stand pipe. I was thinking of shortening the 16" standpipe, but then I was thinking will this need that 16" to prevent backwash up the pipe when it dumps. Ill post a pic
 
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Old 05-08-21, 12:44 PM
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Proposed mounting area


 
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Old 05-08-21, 12:55 PM
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If you use the Filtrol you still need to connect the washer to the top fitting.
The Filtrol is not very large so I'm under the impression that the chamber will be under pressure while the machine is draining.,

Your problem is will the machine pump high enough to mount the Filtrol above the current standpipe.
 
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Old 05-08-21, 01:00 PM
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washing machine question offhand....

I understand pumps will push water uphill for quite a ways, but will only suck a short distance no matter how big they are. just curious how high they will push... if I can get it to push 7 or 8 feet, problem solved. I'll just mount it high.
 
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Old 05-08-21, 01:15 PM
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The pump in a washer is self priming because it's located below the tub.... it's gravity fed and the pump adds pressure to raise the discharge. I've seen washers reach all the way to the ceiling.

I'm surprised you don't have problems with that short standpipe.
Typically 2" and larger is best for a short standpipe.

That line to the left is a vent.... correct ?

 
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Old 05-08-21, 04:52 PM
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vent line

yes, the white pvc to the left going up the outside wall has to be a vent because there is no plumbing at all on that side of the house, the only time Ive had issues with overflow out that 1.5' tube is when we had backup issues with the septic. Almost like an early warning thing. issues started about 18 months ago first time, but I didnt realize the leech field had a 25 year life span. I assumed if I pumped out regularly, it would be its own ecosystem. Now I've found that laundry lint and hair is a field clogger. now that the leech field was jetted and tank pumped ($4200 later)...Im reading about people converting their septics to aerobic systems with an air injector in an attempt to reduce the sediment accumalation in the leech field, most now are two section tanks and have a prefilter before they leave the tank. One guy is advertising a huge bucket of special worms to gobble up the solids, and then their offspring will even migrate to the leach field to eat out there too. replacing the leechfield will be about $25,000. that means septics average $1300/yr. if you go 25 years. Then, they must be completely redone upgraded to new code and tank may need to be replaced, and new perc tests and inspections, and permits... This could get crazy.
 

Last edited by hvac01453; 05-08-21 at 04:57 PM. Reason: additional data
 

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