Dishwasher racks


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Old 01-27-22, 03:00 PM
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Dishwasher racks

Is it just me or do the dishwasher manufacturers intentionally design their racks to rust and fail after a few years and price the replacement parts so it's cheaper to scrap the whole unit?

That was probably a rhetorical question without an answer. Anyway, 5 1/2 year old Maytag MDB4949SDH. Water has gotten past the rubberized coating on the racks in several places and a couple of the vertical rack posts have fallen off or are wobbly and not long for this world.

Anybody have a source for replacements that make economical sense or do we just keep going until so many pieces fall off that it's unusable?
 

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01-31-22, 09:00 AM
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Along those lines, Norm, is there ANYTHING on the PLANET that is NOT "known to the State of California to cause cancer and reproductive or developmental harm."???
 
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Old 01-27-22, 03:22 PM
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In my case I think some of the problem was putting sharp knives in the rack without care. I think they cut the protective coating letting air and water get to the steel underneath. Once rust starts it spreads quickly because it never dries out.

There is color matched touch up coating available that works pretty well if applied early and properly. I've found it best to use sandpaper, file or Dremel to clean the damaged area down to shiny metal. Then apply multiple coats to build up the thickness of the coating. Next time I run into rusty racks I'm going to try Plasti dip and see how well it works.
 
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Old 01-27-22, 11:25 PM
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Something I learned recently after our 12 year old dishwasher racks were totally split and rusting is they make them out of different materials.

The cheaper models use PVC coated racks, the higher end models use vinyl, really high end racks use SS metal.

A replacement rack for our dishwasher was $400, half the cost of a new washer.

This is one of those items that frustrate me, a high wear item that for a few dollars can be resolved but manufactures cut corners!

If it's the ends/tips of the rack you can buy caps that glue on, just cut the rusty end off.
 
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Old 01-28-22, 03:51 AM
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I may already be too late, only noticed it last night when I spotted a leaning post while wife was unloading. Doesn't appear to be tips, but more near the junction on a couple of them where they attach to the base. Also a couple of ends. I'll be taking a closer look this weekend to see if I can slow things up a little; I wouldn't mind getting another 3 or 4 years out of it. The ones I've priced so far look to be in the $100 range, so yeah, would be spending about half cost of new unit. The two spots I noticed were not in areas that should have gotten any damage from use.

Hadn't thought about the Plasti-Dip, might give that a try after cleaning up.

Guess it's our disposable society now; do they still refer to major appliances as "durable goods"? They aren't.
 
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Old 01-28-22, 06:10 AM
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Those tips worked good because you could cut way below the rust then they were glued on. If you can remove whatever is rusting, even the entire riser that will save the rack and that riser wont be missed.
 
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Old 01-29-22, 03:29 PM
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Yeah, my thinking, too. Going to have a go tomorrow.
 
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Old 01-30-22, 06:14 AM
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do they still refer to major appliances as "durable goods"?
Durable goods are defined as something intended to last more than 3 years. IMO a durable good should last more than 10 years.

I have replaced my dishwasher racks with one I have found on Ebay.
 
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Old 01-30-22, 07:04 AM
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I don't think manufacturers cut corners trying to make more profit on the product. I think they deliberately engineer low life expectancy so that they can make more profit on replacement parts.

Think of low cost printers and high cost ink cartridges.
 
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Old 01-30-22, 07:43 AM
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Just noticed the 10 year warranty is supposed to cover this; I wasn't aware the racks were included, but the badge on the front includes the word "racks" and it's in the printed warranty as well. Didn't notice it before.

We'll see tomorrow how good the warranty really is. Stay tuned.
 
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Old 01-30-22, 07:59 AM
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On an item of this nature, I doubt it's intentional to make it cheap, so it fails sooner. More likely it's a production cost saving measure to provide protection at minimal cost.
Appliance manufactures don't rely on repair parts as a major source of income vs selling new units. In fact, manufactures are pretty much against the repair industry overall and will refuse to provide information to the repair industry. I may be in error on this point, but IIRC parts must be available for a 10-year period by most state laws, but not the technical data or related information needed to complete a repair. That is why there is an association called the RIGH TO REPAIR or REPAIR.ORG and is gaining popularity in many states. But many states are not on board. (see Learn About the Right to Repair The Repair Association)
I do believe that the overall design of appliances is in fact dated to last only so long. Much of that is because of the many increased features being incorporated into appliances. Household appliances are getting to be pretty much like a car that will need regular maintenance. Those add-on warranty programs are becoming more popular are as time goes on may become mainstream and a necessary evil.
If you want a more in-depth explanation read this (How appliance makers restrict repairs and enable more e-waste (fastcompany.com) a 9-minute read.
 
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Old 01-31-22, 05:21 AM
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As I understand it, there is an on-going war between auto manufacturers and independent repair facilities as well concerning proprietary information needed for car repairs. The car makers would LOVE it if your only choice for service was at a dealership.

Calling Maytag this morning. FWIW, while I was looking up the number to call, I happen to check those parts FROM Maytag; roughly $500 for the pair. More than we paid total for the washer.
 
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Old 01-31-22, 06:00 AM
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I doubt it's intentional to make it cheap, so it fails sooner.
Actually you can thank your Government for some of this. Their Energy Star ratings drive down component size/reliability such that their longevity is not what it used to be.

Have a buddy that is director of engineering at GE, now Hair, and he confirms what we all see, the long term life of appliances is less than "the good old days". Smaller compressors, pumps, motors just don't last as long.

But back to the comment about the rack, if you know that PVC coated racks are less durable than Vinyl and the cost difference between the two is minimal why would you even offer it, it's just going to upset someone eventually!
 
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Old 01-31-22, 06:41 AM
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Wow, just WOW! Just got off the phone with Maytag customer service; spoke with a very pleasant young lady right here in the U.S. of A. Got all the info, did a quick check on coverage, and racks are on the way (one on short back-order, not expected to be very long wait). I was all spooled up for a battle of fine-print warranty words and didn't need to go there.

Good customer service is alive and well SOMEWHERE in the civilized world.
 
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Old 01-31-22, 07:01 AM
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I agree Marq, not all the problem lie with the manufacture. Much of it is caused by the environmental mandates and how they impact manufacturing. What really bothers me is the lies or twist or spin if you will on the science used to "qualify" the mandates and rules.
Prime example is the electric car and California. It takes more energy to build the car than an IC car. And the rare elements or minerals needed for the batteries is a major strip-mining nightmare. Not to mention the landfills that will be developed from old and used batteries.
Similar about the windmill farms. Not too sure the benefits out way the cost to build or the problems when they fail.
Since I do 3D printing, another one that is close to me is plastics. The science says that PLA is biodegradable. True, but under very specific and laboratory-controlled conditions. In reality all the trinkets and junk being printed by hobbyist and enthusiast are being dumped in landfills that will never biodegrade in hundreds of years. But the manufactures of the PLA tout that it's safe for the environment and people are buying it in bulk. All over the world. Eastern Europe is a big center for 3D printing. I predict within the next 5 to 10 years PLA and ABS plastics just from 3D printing will become a major environmental hazard and conditions will be placed on its use.
Plastic shopping bags were banned in most states after the reality dawned on the tree huggers that paper from our forest is renewable and environmentally safe. But paper bags cost extra, and most don't fit our garbage containers. So, what do they do? They start selling plastic garbage bags! And almost all products are double or tripled wrapped in plastic. Even bananas (with a natural package) are being wrapped in plastic. Go to a typical supermarket and there are plastic rolls of bags to put all you fruit and veggies into! So where is the plastic bag "problem" being solved?
OK, my rant is over. You may return to you regularly scheduled complaints.
 
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Old 01-31-22, 09:00 AM
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Along those lines, Norm, is there ANYTHING on the PLANET that is NOT "known to the State of California to cause cancer and reproductive or developmental harm."???
 
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