Stove Element Receptacles


  #1  
Old 11-23-22, 11:33 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Stove Element Receptacles

I work at an Apartment complex of 110 apartments, complex is 22 years old.
we have many issues with Stoves across the property, the receptacle that the stovetop element plugs into burn out frequently, the OEM parts are made of some sort of black plastic.
we primarily have GE Hotpoint stoves across the property.

I go to some apartments to replace these receptacle on a seemingly bi-weekly basis, and other apartments have zero issues.
I cant pinpoint what the issue here, I have begun buying white ceramic receptacles hoping that this will help.
I can go in and replace receptacles, elements and infinity switches, but after a few weeks I will be back replacing receptacles.
management thinks the tenants remove the elements and drip pans to clean, then dont plug elements back in properly causing sparks, then eventually the sparks cause heat, then the receptacle burns out.

could this be simply poor design? Tenants not using the appliance properly?
any other ideas?
I am kinda out of ideas on how to prevent this



stove receptacles
 
  #2  
Old 11-23-22, 12:28 PM
C
Member
Join Date: May 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 3,282
Received 65 Likes on 50 Posts
Are you cleaning the ends of the elements where they plug into the receptacles? Any resistance there caused by corrosion or baked-on gunk on the ends will generate a lot of heat because of the high current. Cleaning with a mild solvent and then a scotch brite pad or even very fine emery cloth might help.
 
  #3  
Old 11-23-22, 02:17 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 70,951
Received 3,169 Likes on 2,846 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

Have you had problems with the ceramic element sockets ?
I don't see a tenant issue.
 
  #4  
Old 11-23-22, 02:34 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
i have been taking some sandpaper to the element connections to clean them off like you mention(light sanding), ill continue doing this because itll help with the connection like you mention.

i havent been using the ceramic ones very long so far, someone from one of our companies other properties told me that they had issues with the connections inside the ceramic block wearing down, but no issues with the ceramic block crumbling apart like the plastic ones do.
the ceramic ones i was able to get are "universal" so the fitment requires some messing about.

someone asked me if a connection paste (i think they were talking about dielectric grease) would work, but i am not certain if that type of connection is what dielectric grease is meant for.

one manager said they were told to have the elements replaced alongside replacing the block every time O.O $$
 
  #5  
Old 11-23-22, 04:26 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 70,951
Received 3,169 Likes on 2,846 Posts
Replacing the socket when replacing the element..... although a bit more costly.... is the most effective way to approach the problem.

Forget about any greases or oil.
High heat also eliminates many choices.
The only grease that may possibly help is 8463A grease from MG. It's approx $50 an ounce.
8463A siver impregnated grease.
 
The following users liked this post:
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: