Refrigerator closure - adding magnets


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Old 01-22-23, 05:54 PM
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Refrigerator closure - adding magnets

Our refrigerator door no longer seals without effort. I've gone through the possibilities and believe the gasket magnets no longer have sufficient strength. I've looked at replacing the gasket but the cost is probably not much less than the value of the refrigerator. My thinking is to add magnets behind the gaskets. What type of magnets should I use and what grade? For example, should I use flexible magnet strips?
 
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Old 01-23-23, 01:12 AM
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I don't think I've seen magnetic door seals in years.
Most doors are closed and sealed by vacuum via the fan.

You can buy magnetic strips but I don't think it's thin enough and I'm not sure there is metal where the gasket seals.
 
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Old 01-23-23, 06:02 AM
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I think you can forget adding magnets to the door seals. With an older fridge there is a chance you'll crack or damage the seals trying to remove them. Then, there isn't room to place separate magnets behind the seals.

Replacing the door seals is the best fix. You could install an external latch or strap on the door to help hold it fully closed.
 
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Old 01-23-23, 06:37 AM
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You could install an external latch or strap on the door to help hold it fully closed.
I don't think that is legal in the sense that it's not much different than making a non-code electrical connection. It might work, but if something happens, your responsible for the effects.
In this case, by law all refrigerators must be able to be opened from the inside.
Refrigerator Safety Act in 1956
 
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Old 01-23-23, 06:48 AM
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Not sure exactly what "no longer seals without effort" means.

Do you mean that you need to push on the door a bit then it seals?
Also does it open a lot easier than in the past? This would be a better indicator of poor magnets.

I also think that adding magnets is a no go.

Clean the seal and it's wrinkles. Also clean the face of the fridge where it seals.
Put a light coat of lithium grease on the hinge side of the seal. Sometimes the seal on that side can grab when closing and causes problems,
Check that the door swings easily.
Also check that the door is aligned properly.
Check for any obstruction in the fridge.

 
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Old 01-23-23, 07:51 AM
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Check the web for recharging a magnet. Might find a method that you can try.
 
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Old 01-23-23, 08:54 AM
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An LG french door refrigerator purchased in 2007 had a problem where the doors would remain open about 1/4 inch if not pushed closed. This caused the lights to stay on and the compressor to stop running. There were known instances of the lights causing fires from that condition. I did not have that problem, but reduced the bulb sizes from 60W to 25W. One time the door did not close when I went away for a weekend and I lost all the food in the refrigerator and in the freezer because the compressor did not run.

I bought some powerful neodymium magnets and was able to fashion a bracket for them at the top of each door. This was enough to pull the door the last 1/4 inch closed.

I replaced the refrigerator in 2014 even though it was still working.
 
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Old 01-23-23, 02:02 PM
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I don't think I've seen magnetic door seals in years.
Most doors are closed and sealed by vacuum via the fan.
Pjmax, thanks for the comment. I believe you helped solve my problem.

The doors clearly have magnets. Using different size nails, I was able to confirm the freezer door magnets are considerably stronger than the refrigerator door. But, instead of using magnets, I lowered the the temperature to get the fan working harder and it solved the problem.
 
 

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