220v crimp butt connectors ok?


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Old 03-29-23, 03:24 PM
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220v crimp butt connectors ok?

I've lined up a new 4 burner cooktop, and there is plenty of wire left from the old cooktop to crimp and butt connect to the new cooktop.

Is this generally accepted? The replacement cooktop is a new takeout where there is 3" of wiring left to connect to. I was thinking crimp style insulated butt connectors with shrink tubing on top. It appears to be 14g wiring.

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-29-23, 03:35 PM
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That wire size sounds small for a cook top.
The wiring they use in mfg and what is required for hookup may not be the same.
You need to consult the install manual which should cover wire connection size.
The splices must also be inside a junction box.

Crimp caps are an accepted method of connection for copper wiring.
I wouldn't use butt crimps although they are also approved.
 
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Old 03-29-23, 04:34 PM
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Thanks for the fast response. I mistook my wire stripping size gauge of the 16g to measure the gauge, tho it didnt nick the wire as I stripped off ends. It really is 14g running to the burners.

I'm now looking for confirmation of this finding. There are 3 wires from the old (red, black, white) and 2 wires on the new (red, black). Of course there is a ground as well on both. The white on the old runs from a 3 terminal block (back of stove) to first the power indicator light, then on to a burner control.

The terminal block measures 220v across red and black, and 110v to red or black to white. My working theory for now is that white is 110v for the oven lamp, and stovetop power indicator.

The new unit runs 220v to the power indicator and clearly indicates 220v on the lamp via the red wire feed.

Does my white wire theory seem plausible? The old unit is 40+ years old. No issues, just sad looking.

 
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Old 03-29-23, 04:47 PM
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Most old units had only three wires.....red, black and white. They used white as neutral and ground.

So there are three or four wires ?
Red, black, white and ground is four wires.

If your old unit had four wires and the new one only has three....
the new one doesn't require a neutral but still requires a ground.

 
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Old 03-29-23, 05:26 PM
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Your summary of the 4 wire setup is correct. I'm off to get a replacement cable entry grommet.

Thanks!
 
 

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