Replacing old inside wall mounted exhaust fan

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Old 06-13-08, 02:49 PM
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Replacing old inside wall mounted exhaust fan

My house is 40+ years old and I need to replace the exhaust fan in the bathroom. It emits a grinding, squeaking noise that drives everybody crazy. The new fans I find in stores are too large for the existing hole, and (see my handle) although I am female, I am IT when it comes to home repair. I'm not afraid of electricity (that means I know where to turn it off and keep it off, know how to disconnect and connect wires), and I'm pretty handy, having done lots of home repairs myself.

Do any of you experts think that I should try my hand at replacing this old exhaust fan? (I don't know yet whether it just leads into the attic or actually vents to the outside. What problems am I likely to find?

Any confidence in me out there? Any advice? I would hate to have to pay an electrician.....
 
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Old 06-13-08, 03:34 PM
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Couple of Questions, Dry wall or plaster, is there a vent tube connected to the old one. Only problems I see is cutting the hole to fit and connecting the vent tube. Wiring should be easy.
 
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Old 06-14-08, 06:31 AM
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Thanks for responding! The walls are dry wall. I would suppose there is a vent tube connecting to the old one, but to confirm I will have to climb into the attic. Let me go find a ladder....
 
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Old 06-14-08, 07:37 AM
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I'm no exhaust fan expert, but mine started squeaking about 3 years ago. I lubed it and it's still running quiet. Didn't require removal as it is in the ceiling and it was the bottom most bearing.

Have you checked to see what is squeaking? You may have options of lubing, changing only the motor, replacing a bearing, etc. depending on what is squeaking.

Of course if you have to break walls to access the fan, then nothing short of a new entire unit would be wise.
 

Last edited by TerryHenson; 06-14-08 at 09:50 AM.
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Old 06-14-08, 12:21 PM
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Dry wall very easy to work. Wen a building supply store to get fan go to dry wall dept and get a small hand dry wall saw, Well worth the few bucks to get it.
 
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Old 06-25-08, 04:28 PM
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If it's over the shower I think it now needs to be on a GFI, but I'm not an electrician.

http://nfpaweb3.gvpi.net/rrserver/br...NFPASTD/7008SB
courtesy of another forum member.
 
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Old 07-02-08, 03:07 PM
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When you say it's in the wall I assume you mean the ceiling. If it is in the wall it's probably vented directly through the wall to the outside If you have attic access the thing to do is climb up there and see if it is vented to the outside either through the roof or the wall. A bathroom fan in a full bath (shower) should not be vented into the attic because of the moisture. You will also want to measure the size of the duct coming out of the fan to make sure it's the same size as the replacement fan. It's no big deal if the replacement fan itself is bigger than the existing fan--just enlarge the hole with a drywall saw making sure that you're not running into any joists. After that it's a piece of cake. You may need to nail a piece of wood between the joists if the fan won't butt up against one. The fans I've put in didn't have adjustable hanger bars like recessed light cans do. You either need to nail it to a joist or a piece of wood that you've nailed between the joists. The wiring is easy since you're just replacing.
 
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Old 07-03-08, 01:18 PM
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Fans in general

Be careful not to steal "combustion air'', the air that gas appliances need to fully burn the gas.

A room or space of "ordinary tightness" needs 50 cu. ft. per 1000 BTU/hr. My furnace is 167,000 BTU/hr so the space needs to be 8350 cu. ft.

Doors or not, louvers or not, strong fans or not, can change all this.
 
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