Telephone jack wiring--getting rid of 2nd line

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Old 08-02-02, 09:48 AM
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dbgrrl
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Question Telephone jack wiring--getting rid of 2nd line

Our home is currently wired for 2 lines. We only want one line to be active. The jack on the first floor is active and working fine, and the jack on the second floor is inactive and wired to be a second line. We want the second floor jack to be the same line as the first floor jack. Our outside box has 2 jacks in it, which each have a black telephone company wire hooking into it. Can we just take the Green and Red wires from the box for the second line and attach them to the jack for the first line? Or does this wiring have to be done inside the house? Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 08-02-02, 11:46 AM
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If the second line in the interface box (i.e., the outside box) is connected with red and green, then yes, the correct solution is simply to move these wires in the interface box from the second line and attach them to where the first line is attached.
 
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Old 08-02-02, 11:47 AM
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I don't really know if it was proper or not, but that is exactly what I did on my house. I haven't had a problem yet.
 
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Old 08-03-02, 07:21 AM
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The telephone jack has for pins on it. The center two pins are for the first line, the outer two pins are for the second line.

Note that "first" and "second" above refer to this particular outlet, not the whole house.

Telephone wiring within the house is, I've discovered, in general, a big mess. The cable goes from the outside interface to one outlet to the next to the next to the next to the next. If everything is done right, at each outlet, red goes to red, black to black, green to green, and yellow to yellow.

That's rarely the case, unfortunately.

So it's often a matter of tracing backward from one outlet to another to find out what wire isn't spliced where.

The good news is that with telephone wiring you're not going to burn the house down or injure yourself. If you wire it wrong the worst that can happen is that the phone won't work.

You can make a cheap telephone outlet tester by taking a regular phone and about 5 feet of phone cord. Cut the cord, strip the two inner conductors and put alligator clips on 'em. You can then open a telephone jack up and use the alligator clips to determine which pair(s) of wires is a telephone line. Just hook up the clips and listen for a dial tone. This is much easier than unscrewing the terminals, swapping wires around, and testing by plugging a phone into the jack.
 
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Old 08-06-02, 06:44 AM
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dbgrrl
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Talking It worked!

Thanks for all the advice, it worked! I just figured out which jack worked, and took the wires from the other jack and connected them to the working jack and voila! A working phone line. The only thing I'm wondering now is if this will affect DSL performance, once I get that installed....
 
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Old 08-11-02, 09:52 PM
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Phone lines will not burn down the house but...

This is a reply directed to Nogginboink.

No, phone lines are not going to burn down your house but you can get hurt from them.

Phone lines carry voltage, it take -48 Volts DC to bring dial tone to your house. They call that talk battery.

Ring Gen is typically 96 Volts AC. If you are working with the wires and you happen to be holding the ring side of the circuit and touching ground while someone calls you will get zapped.

If you are working in an interface box some of them can carry signifigantally more voltage than that depending on the type of equipment may be in that box. If there is a two wire HDSL T1 in the box it takes 185 volts to deliver that service. A technology called Pair Gain Plus is a device which takes one pair of wires and converts it up to 6 pairs of wires. I haven't measured the voltage on these but I have sure felt it. I know its signifigant.

Luckily, the amps are rather low on all this stuff unless your in the Central office itself. That's where the really nasty stuff that will kill you is. I have seen a have inch ratchet cut right in half from the electric in a Power Distribution Frame (PDF) in a C.O. so its nasty stuff.

Anything with power running through it should be respected including phone lines. Grabbing a pair of phone wires that are ringing I promise you will only do it once without being careful.
RF Burns hurt trust me!
 
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Old 08-12-02, 06:39 AM
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When you get DSL, I would probably run a new phone line (Cat 5) from wherever you place your modem to the main line. If you are daisy chained all the way back you will have alot of noise on the phone line you use. You may get it to work, but it may limit your data speeds.
When you get hooked up for DSL they will have to come test your lines, then you can know for sure. But don't be surprised if they tell you that you will need a new line to your outlet.
Also, for DSL to work, you have to have all 4 wires connected correctly. Not just the 2 that you use for your phone.
 
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Old 08-12-02, 08:47 PM
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Actually for DSL you will need a RJ-45 phone jack (larger plug than a regular phone jack). Depending on the type of DSL it is (ADSL,HDSL, SDSL ect) it may even have a different network interface box seperate from your phone lines. The tech will have to come out and at least test it at the network interface. More than likely for an additional charge they will run the inhouse wiring and install the jack and all. Then again they may just do a home run right into the router. From the router to the computer or hub is typically the customers responsibility (not always). That is nothing more than a patch cable with a RJ-45 on each end. An RJ-45 is nothing more than a larger version of a typical phone cord end. It has 8 conductors in it. If you need the color code I can give you that no problem. One important note is if you are going from a router directly into a computer you need a crossover cable. If you are going from a router to a hub then from the hub to a computer you use straight through cables. At any rate. Everything from the Network interface to the computer should only use Catagory 5 cable. That is twisted pair, sheilded four pair cable. As far as daisy chaining DSL, it will not add noise. You may get a loss of signal if your connections are not done correctly. The best way to add more jacks to a DSL is to install a RJ-21X block (typically called a 66 punch down block) You don't need a 25 pair block for a typical home, they sell smaller verisons. That block is nothing more that a junction point in which you can add more extensions. The other way to do it is to add a RJ-45 patch panel which is similar to a hub but its not electronic or powered its just wiring. It's a series of RJ-45 jacks that you can branch out from to add jacks or use it to patch between floors. As you can see you have many options. As far as having 4 wires for the circuit. The difference between a phone line and DSL is that DSL seperates the transmit and recieve. One pair is transmit and the other is recieve. I could get alot deeper into this but I would be here all night. If anyone has any further questions on how it works, how to test it, how to wire it or anything else for that matter let me know I will do the best I can to help. Feel free, hope this helps!
 
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Old 08-13-02, 06:47 AM
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For my DSL, they used the Existing (Cat3) wiring, and an existing (normal sized) phone jack. They just had to make sure that all 4 wires were connected. I was able to achieve the capped (1.5 down/128 up) bandwidth without any new wiring to the House. This was 3 years ago, I have since moved and now use a cable modem (cheaper).

Evidently (as per Phonetek), in some places they do it differently. You may want to look into it. Having the phone company run a simple cat5 line and installing a jack will probably cost you a boat-load of bananas. I would recommend doing it yourself if you are capable. But don't run anything if you don't have to.
 
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Old 08-13-02, 08:37 PM
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Phonetek
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Some companies include installing 1 jack and cable to it as part as the initial install. They usually install something so you can use it, I know the company I work for does. If the provider just drops the circiut on the back wall of the house and says "Well it's here, good luck hooking it up" Then you are using the wrong provider, find a different company. As noise bleeding threw to your phone line, I misread it the first time. Noise should not bleed threw from a dsl line to a phone line if you wire isn't damaged, brittle or very old. If the wire is like that the DSL wont work anyways. As far as doing it different in other places, that may be true but I personally am going by the industry's national standard that has been around since Mable and the switchboard and the candlestick phone.

NOTE: I have emailed the monerators about adding a Telco forum specifically for quesitons of this nature. He replied by saying it was a good idea so watch for it and stop it. I'll be there to help as much as I can! See ya there!
 
  #11  
Old 08-13-02, 11:11 PM
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Yes, you can burn down a house from the voltage running thru phone lines. In fact, in the past year, a house DID burn down in my county. The fire investigation revealed that it was a staple that cut into the actual phone wiring. It is hard to beieve, but there even was an article in the paper.

Captain.
 
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Old 08-15-02, 07:45 PM
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Phonetek
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Wow, I never heard of that happening but I do beleive it. Usually when a staple gets popped through a cable it usually will short the line out and put it out of service. Now, if it created what they call a ground hum which is usually a slight short typically on the Ring side of the circuit it will not put it out of service in the switch. Hence, the voltage is still there while the number is in service. As I stated above, talk batter is -48 Volts DC. That wouldn't burn down the house but maybe the Ring Gen voltage did which again is aprox 96 Volts AC. So, when someone called it's what sparked the fire. It was probably a telemarketer too, they should sue! Seriously though, I am quite shocked to hear that happened. I'm gonna do some research on this to find out exactly how this can happen. If I find out I will post it here.
 
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