switch wiring

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  #1  
Old 08-03-02, 05:55 PM
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banditowner
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switch wiring

i want to install a new light and wall switch i am ok with finding power from a near by outlet to power the light and doing that part of the wiring ,my question is how to do the wiring from the light to the wall switch to cut it off and on. thanks in advance
 
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  #2  
Old 08-03-02, 06:23 PM
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lrning
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Let me first say that, I'm a do it yourselfer and learn through reading books. So, for things like this, it would really benefit you to find some good reference materials that contain detailed illustrations. First, make sure the existing circuit your extending off of has enough power for this new light - which really depends on how many other lights/outlets are currently on this circuit.

I just recently did this and the trick is to get the power to cut on/off correctly. Here's what I did: "Mark the white wire, running from the fixture box to the switch, black at both ends (you can wrap a piece of electrical tape around each end). Splice the black feed wire (from the power source - which in your case is another outlet) to the white wire that is marked black. Splice the other black wire (the one running from the fixture to the switch) to the fixture's black lead, and splice the white wire from the power source to the fixture's white lead. Remember to connect all grounding wires. At the switch, connect the black wire and the white wire (which is marked black at the end) to the switch terminals. Connect the grounds."
 
  #3  
Old 08-03-02, 07:09 PM
M
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This job is easier to understand (and IMHO generally better) if you bring your continuous power into the switch box rather than to the light.

Bring power into the switch box with 12-2 (for 20A circuit) or 14-2 (for 15A circuit). Run another 12-2 or 14-2 from the switch box to the light.

In the switch box tie the two white wires together with a wire nut. Connect one black to one screw of the switch, the other black to the other screw (doesn't matter which wire goes to which screw). Connect the bare wires together and to the green ground screw on the switch.

At the light just connect black to black, white to white, and bare to green (may be a green wire, may be a green screw).
 
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Old 08-03-02, 08:11 PM
J
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What Irning said is legal, safe, and correct. However, I agree with Mike. A large percentage of the problems posted in this forums are due to confusion over switch loops, so I say it's better to avoid them when possible.
 
  #5  
Old 08-04-02, 08:51 AM
M
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Also, it's a matter of "future-proofing" your house. I have installed a number of X-10 (remote wireline control) dimmers in my house. These require a neutral in the switch box - cannot be used on switch loops.
 
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