wiring dryer to sub-panel

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Old 09-04-00, 10:37 AM
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I am wiring a new 220 volt receptical for our dryer (two blades at 45 degrees and one L prong). There is space of a 30 amp 2 pole breaker in a sub-panel (not the main service panel). Does it "meet code" to wire a three wire ("non-grounded") receptical to a subpanel, or does it have to be a four progn (grounded)type of receptical since it is to a sub-panel and not the main service panel? (If it must be a four prong receptical, I can change the dryer wire to a four wire cable, which is available at the store.)

For wiring the three hole receptical, am I correct in assuming: red-blade; black-blade; white-L, and the bare wire goes to nothing...is this correct? many thanks.

ken
 
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Old 09-04-00, 06:46 PM
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If you are installing a new branch circuit feeding a range or dryer, a four conductor cable must be installed with a four prong plug. This is true whether new or old structure. A three prong receptacle is allowed to be used only if it is an existing branch circuit, not a new run. NEC 250-140 Range 40 amp rated or more, and the dryer 30 amp rated. 10 ga cu. to dryer and 8 ga. cu or larger to range.

It does not matter whether you are feeding from a sub panel or a main panel. Just make sure that the main panel is large enough to carry the load that is connected to it including the maximum connected load of all sub panels. Also the sub panel must be fed with four conductors. Two hots, one neutral, and one gounding conductor. The neutral and the grounding conductors must be with separate bars in the sub panel. The sub panle must be large enough to carry the load connected to it.

Good Luck

Wg
 
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Old 09-04-00, 07:16 PM
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Wg: Thanks very much for taking the time to write your comments, which are quite helpful.

The sub-panel only has 3 leads: 2 hot and 1 neutral. There is no separate grounding bar. I see both neutral wires and ground wires connected to the neutral bar in the sub-panel. I assume that the subpanel is grounded via its connection to the main service panel.

It would appear based on Wg's comments that a new 4 wire subpanel is required to do this job such that it meets code, and in this case I will hire an electrician. However, is it SAFE to wire the three prong non-grounded receptacle and use the dryer this way, since this is the fashion in which the dryer had originally been wired before we moved to this house?

When a homeowner does a small job specifically like this one in a fashion that meets previous code, but does not meet present code, are there adverse ramifications from an insurance coverage standpoint if something bad happened?

Again, many thanks,
Ken
 
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Old 09-04-00, 09:04 PM
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Yes kevin anytime something is done to a home there can be ramifactions from it with the insurance company that is why you need to do this work correctly there is a fine line on hooking the dryer up if a circuit allready exist then you can hook up but if you have to run a circuit then it needs to be code correct. Now the law does [nec book ] does not say you have to have a liscense it just says qualified to do work so if you want to run a ground from your main to the sub and the seperate the grounds and neutrals {grounded conductor white wire } from each other in your sub you can do that but do the work you are comfortable with you would not want an intern doing heart surgey on you would you unless he was pretty well experienced so do what you are comfortable with
 
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Old 09-05-00, 11:26 PM
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I am with Doc

There is an old saying. The only difference between a good boy and a bad boy is probably the good boy never got caught.

Even if you do not have an Inspector in your jurisdiction, you are still responsible to meet the Code.

If your house catches fire, or your dryer has a short and someone gets hurt when you did not meet Code. Even the insurance company will pay large sums of money to catch you not meeting code so that they are not liable, and you will be liable. You may be risking everything that you own and have worked your whole life to get.

The bad thing about electricity is that if you wire it wrong and create a safety hazard, this patient electrical hazard will wait for years just to cause harm, and it only takes a split second to kill by electricution.

Electricity is one of the most used and abused commodities in our lives. It also can be one of the most dangerous if the minimum safety standards are not met.

Let your conscience be your guide.

Good Luck

Wg
 
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