Baseboard Heat

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Old 09-18-00, 05:50 AM
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Hello everyone. It's probably too much info to go into here, but does anyone know a web site with info on baseboard heat. Sizing units for a room, size of the breaker/wires, etc . . . Thanks
 
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Old 09-18-00, 07:40 PM
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Don't know of a web site, but might be of a little help.

To size the amount of heat in short form try the following;

Room Calculation

Width times the length times the highth

This gives you cubic feet of room.

Now if you live in the midwest area of the US then take the cubic feet of the room and multiply that by 1.5. This gives you an adjustment for the heating degree days of that area. If you are in a different temperature range for your area then ask a local heat man for the adjustment for heating degree days with the average doors and windows of a dwelling. They should get you close for your area on the heating degree days of your area. Just replace the 1.5 by your area adjustment factor.

Once you multiply by the heating degree days you have the answer in wattage requiered to heat that room. This should put you close from brick construction to wood frame new insulation values. Approximately.

Now if you are using heat such as cable ceiling heat the wattage is what you need.

If you are using baseboard heat check with your manufacturer but most baseboard type heat are based on 250 watts per foot. So divide you wattage required to heat that room and divide it by 250 watts per foot and you should have the feet of baseboard heat that you should be ok with approximately.

Now design of your baseboard heat as to where to mount them in your room, your baseboard heat should be split up to be placed under you windows and on each side of patio doors and near you outside doors. These placements are to counter act the heat loss and convection heat loss caused by your windows.

Watch that you do not block the heaters with furniture, curtains, etc.

Do not install receptacles over baseboard heaters. The lamp cords plugged into the receptacle above the baseboard heater will drape past the front of the heater and melt.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
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Old 09-18-00, 07:51 PM
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Sorry I didn't mention breakers etc.

1920 watts are rated for 80% of a 20 amp breaker for continuous use rated at more than 3 hours non stop use of the equipment. If you figure 250 watts per foot then you could install approximately 15' on a 240 volt 20 amp circuit at 80% rating.

If you need more than that per one room you can go to 10 ga wire on a 30 amp breaker. This would allow you 23' on a 30 amp 240 volt circuit.

I advise installing the thermostat on the inside wall away from the heaters.

If this is not possible then you can mount theromstats right on the heaters themselves.

Good Luck

Wg
 
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Old 09-19-00, 11:13 AM
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Excellent. Just what I needed to know. Thanks alot for the help.
 
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