Installing European crystal chandelier

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Old 09-20-00, 01:04 PM
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I have purchased a crystal chandelier from the Czech Republic. I want to replace my current light fixture with the new but the new has instructions in Czech. It does not have a threaded rod at the top above the brass ceiling plate like my current one. Can/should I replace the one that came with it with the current one. The new one has a rod with a metal loop at the top including a metal bracket with a screw on each side of the bracket. There are also four wires coming up out of the rod blue, brown, black, and yellow/green. Which do I attach to the current circuit. (The chandelier was made for 220v installation in Europe but I have light bulb adapters for the sockets.)
 
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Old 09-20-00, 02:48 PM
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hello stan,
the hook is what holds the chandaller up the screws attach to the box. i persionaly would replace it with the old canape simply because it is stronger. now as to what colors attach where, this i cant say for sure, u will have to do some testing with a conunity light or ohm meter. connect 1 leg of tester to the shell(threaded part where u screw in the bulb) of a light socket and test each wire till u get a reading this will be the nutural and attaches to the white, next attach to the button (small metal piece in the bottom of the light socket) and test remaining wires the 1 that gives u a reading will be the hot, "u could possabily get a reading on 2 of the wires since this is a 220", this or these will be the hot, and connects to the black wire, next attach 1 leg of tester to a metal part of light and test the 11 that gives u the reading is the ground and attaches to the bare wire.
now i also must tell u that this light is NOT ul aproved and according to the code cant be installed in the us, if by some chance u had a fire your insurance company could "possabily" have an out on paying. i will also tell u that there r many non ul aproved lights in use today. i for 1 have 2 in my own home 1 is a real old gasfired light that i converted, and a chandelear that was in my great grand mothers home that i rewired it as well, my insurance company knows i have both in use and have no problem with it, this is why i say possabily
 
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Old 09-20-00, 04:28 PM
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I'm curious. What are these "light bulb adaptors"? Is this something that allows you to plug a U.S. light bulb in a European socket?
 
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Old 09-20-00, 06:53 PM
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I got a doubt! Is this light more than 50 pounds? If so then the NEC requires that this fixture is mounted to the supporting structure without the weight on the box.

You described a hook and a plate with screws. I suspect that this is an unusually heavy fixture. If it is we have some special installation proceedures to perform.

If your fixture weighs more than 50 pounds then you should find a steel support cable in the chain connected to the fixture. Your hooke needs to pass through the light fixture box containing the wiring connections and is supposed to connect directly to the supporting members in the attic above the ceiling. There is many ways to support this heavy fixture to the supporting members, most common one is to span two ceiling joists with an angle iron with a eye bolt connected throught the angle iron. The hook should hang from the eye bolt and the hook should be closed if the ceiling is over 18' high. The steel cable should be pulled tight almost lifting the fixture and then bolted to the angle iron. The angle iron should be lag bolted or screwed to the top of the supporting ceiling joists with the angle iron laying across the two supporting ceiling joists.

The fixture wires should be connected to the light fixture box flush with the ceiling that the chain and steel cable passed through.

Sparky is right. I would question the wiring design of this fixture and back trace each wire individually to know how it is wired.

Several European countries use a 200 volt system in place of the 120 volt system we have. They also are using 50 cycle frequency.

The adapters are to be used if necessary. If you have light sockets that look like our sockets that we are used to, you have a choice. The electrical wholesale supply houses probably have 120 volt and 200 volt light bulbs in stock. Like Sparky said back trace all the wires going in the fixture and know how the design is supposed to work. If the sockets look like ours you could install 200 volt bulbs and feed it with 240 volt power source. If it is wired like Sparky suspects then you will have to use the adapters or rewire the fixture.

You might check, Ul does approve some out of the country fixtures. Sparky is correct many electrical equipment is sliding by not approved by a recognized testing lab.

Good Luck

Wg
 
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Old 09-23-00, 10:22 AM
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You might also want to check the wires will carry enough amps without getting hot: at 220 volts the amps are half what you will pass through the wires at 110v for the same wattage. In europe brown is hot (live) black is neutral, green/yellow is ground and blue can be either.
 
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Old 09-23-00, 05:41 PM
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peterm

Good thinking!

I never even had a thought about the voltage going down and the amps going up! I wonder if I spaced that in the past on this type of foriegn equipment?

Wg
 
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