GFI muliple connections

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Old 09-26-00, 09:30 AM
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Hello -

I have the '99 NEC, but I can't find the code section that covers these two question that I have. I would appreciate someone pointing me into the correct '99 NEC section.

1. I'm building a new detached garage (two storries)the garage section is required to have all outlets GFI protected (except, dedicated circuits - e.g., freezer). Is there a code that has information about how many GFI recptecle are required per circuit? I mean, can I have ONE GFI per circuit breaker circuit?

2. In the trench from my house to the garage (18 inches deep)the main electrical power is being run in Electrical conduit. I want to run a phone line in the same trench (not the same conduit!) Is there a section that I can read that tell me how I can do this (e.g., clearances)?

Joe
 
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Old 09-26-00, 10:07 AM
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1. One GFCI outlet will protect the whole string provided it is the first one in the circuit and is connected correctly. The power gets connected to the "line" side of the GFCI outlet, and the rest of the circuit gets connected to the "load" side. These will be marked.

2. Someone else will be able to quote code for you, I can't. But, as long as the low voltage (phone line) is not in the conduit with the high voltage (power line), then you should be OK. I would want the phone line in its own conduit so it is more protected from the odd landscape project. 18" isn't very deep.

[This message has been edited by ranck (edited September 26, 2000).]
 
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Old 09-26-00, 06:10 PM
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Read "electrical" post by allyoop right next to yours. This should answer your questions.

Foot note below article 220-3-b and dwelling catogory of the same Table is where the 3 volt amp per square foot is found for the general lighting loads which is your receptacles. 210-11-b is where the general lighting receptacle load must be evenly proportioned.

Take the outside dimensions of you home [square footage] multiply that times the 3 volt amps = total general lighting and receptacle load. Now you must decide 15 amps or 20 amps. Lets take twenty amps conductors and breakers serving the general light load of this dwelling. Multiply 240 volts times 20 amps you get 2400 volt amps. This would be the maximum load allowed on a 20 amp circuit for general lighting in a dwelling settings at the allowed rating of 100% load per circuit. Now take the answer from the square footage of the house and divide the 2400 watts allowed per 20 amp circuit. This tells you the minimum number of 20 amp circuits allowed to serve the dwelling. Now count up all the receptacles in the dwelling and you must install these receptacles evenly on at least that many 20 amp breakers.

Good Luck

Wg
 
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Old 09-26-00, 06:15 PM
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Got so long winded forgot to warn you. Some AHJ's will rule the detached structure not a part of the dwelling. If this is the case you must limit your receptacle loads to 180 volt amps at a rating of 80% totaling a maximum of 10 receptacles on a 20 amp circuit. Some AHJ's rule all buildings as residential. This can get ticklish as to what is residential [a place to park your car only] and what if commercial [a home repair garage would be an example. My advice is clear this question up with your local electrical inspector.

Good Luck

Wg
 
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Old 09-27-00, 01:29 PM
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Thanks - all the extra information is useful, but is there any concerns about running phone line cable in the same trench that I'm running the main supply power to the garage (question 2)?
Joe
 
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Old 09-27-00, 02:02 PM
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If you're just going to use the phone line for voice traffic, I wouldn't be too concerned. If you're going to use the phone line for data traffic, I'd get it as far away from the electrical wiring as possible -- at least six inches. Use cat-5 wiring for extra protection against interference.
 
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