Power pole to house weatherhead ??

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  #1  
Old 08-28-02, 01:21 PM
WhaleMstr
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Power pole to house weatherhead ??

Okay, here's what's going on now.
According to the building department, I no longer have to trench a line from the power company pole (actually MY pole), to another short pole with a disconnect on it, and then take the weatherhead out of the trailer and reroute the wiring down through the floor and then into the disconnect.
What they told me is that since the trailer was built that way, and nothing has been modified, then all I need to do is run the incoming wire from the power pole to the weatherhead! The run is about 45'.
The building inspecter told me that I needed to use 4/0 wire, but talking with the power guy this AM, he said that if I had a 200A service in the trailer that would be correct. However, I only have a 100A service in the trailer and he told me that 2/0 would be sufficient.
My question is, what size, type, and style of wire do I need to make this connection? Should I just try and find a contractor in the area that would go ahead and do all this for me? Is this something that I can do myself? I am not a total novice when it comes to work? I know I need to route the wire from the panel back up the pole and to the weatherhead, but do not know exactly what's involved? Is there a web site that would show a pic or two of this? Can some of you experts tell me what I am up against? Do bears really s&^% in the woods?
Man, way too many questions huh?
Anyway, thanks for any help and sorry for any confusion. BTW, a neighbor of mine gave me 5 rolls of #10 stranded wire that his electrician son had used to wire his well. His run is only about 20' though and mine is 250 so I am kind of leary about using that!
Enough, enough, okay thanks and talk at ya later,
Dan
 
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  #2  
Old 08-28-02, 08:48 PM
bwetzel
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We could point you in the right direction by giving some instructions on this board,but someone would have to inspect it. If you really want to attempt this, pull a permit and we would gladly help you along. You have to explain somethings first. Where is the meter? Is it on the pole, or on the trailer? If it is on the pole,Do you plan on going underground from there or overhead. Is there a place for a point of attachment on the trailer? ex. Mast or a service eye. Let us know and we would be glad to help.
 
  #3  
Old 08-29-02, 07:22 AM
WhaleMstr
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Well bwetzel, like I described in the first post, I need to run the wires from the power pole weatherhead 45' to the weatherhead on my trailer.
The trailer is a '69 and it was built with a weatherhead in it. The new power pole I put up has a 200A service on it. The meter box etc. is there. It has a weatherhead that will be hooked up to the power lines. From there, I need to connect to the weatherhead on the trailer.
BTW, it's all permitted.
The meter will be on the new pole, of course. The inspecters as I described, told me that I do NOT need to put a disconnect in front of the trailer and I do NOT need to trench the wiring to the disconnect. All I need to do now, is run wiring from the meter box, ( 200A service ), up the new power pole, and then overhead to the weatherhead sticking out of the trailer. The trailer itself has a 100A service panel in it. Everything in the trailer is gas as far as major appliances go, so basically all that's being powered is lighting and plug-ins. Plus, I still need to run a line 250' up to my well from the new power pole.
Thanks for any help and I hope this is what you were wondering about, thanks,
Dan

If they haven't turned it off because of too many visitors, the pics of the pole can be viewed at Power Pole Pics ,
there is a directory link at the bottom of the first page and it is sometimes turned off because of the amount of traffic that goes to the site. If it doesn't work try again later, I believe I have at least 3 pics of the power pole and the trailer behind it.
 
  #4  
Old 08-29-02, 03:13 PM
hornetd's Avatar
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Wiring at your yard pole.

The picture at http://www.geocities.com/a10065/powerpole1.html was very helpful.

Have you installed the service grounding electrodes yet? You can use two ground rods spaced at least six feet apart and connected to the bonded grounded conductor buss bar in the service equipment enclosure with a number six copper conductor. Code permits the rods to be right next to the footing.

If that pole footing contains at least twenty feet of rebar that is tied together into a grid with tie wires than clamp a number four (number two is better) copper conductor to it with an acorn clamp. Run pvc conduit from the rebar to the pole mounted service equipment enclosure and connect the number four copper to the bonded grounded conductor buss.

Even better is to dig a trench around the footer at a depth of two and one half to three feet that will be at least twenty feet long. Lay bare number two copper in the trench, close the loop with a buriable saddle clamp (optional). Run the unspliced conductor through an acorn clamp on the rebar and then up the pole. Leave enough to connect it to both of the bare drop conductors using copper aluminum compatible split bolt connectors. Install a lay in lug on the back side of the service equipment enclosure to bond the Grounding Electrode Conductor to the enclosure were it goes up the pole.

Since the panel in the trailer is only 100 amps you can indeed run #2 aluminum Service Entry cable back up the yard pole to a new, separate, weather head mounted on the trailer side of the pole. Use four conductor SE cable that contains three insulated and one ground. Leave three feet of conductor hanging out of the weather head. Install a pole bolt through the pole with one end facing the house. Use the concave pole washers to bear the pressure of the nuts. Install insulators on both ends of the pole bolt. You may have to go to a Graybar electric in order to get your pole hardware. The pole bolt should be below the weather heads by at least one foot. Run ten feet more than the measured distance of quadplex from the pole insulator that faces the house to the drop bracket on the trailer mast. A drop bracket is a clamp that fits on the mast that has an insulator to except the bare conductor of the quadplex. You use a rented fence come along with a cable grip on it to draw the quadplex up to the yard pole. Leave some droop in the drop wire. Do not draw it up drum tight. Leave three feet more conductor than it takes to reach the insulators at each end of the drop. This leaves you four wire feet worth of droop or sag. Your supply house should be able to supply the clamps that are used to clamp the bare ACSR conductor of the quad plex to the insulators.

Run three #2 Al conductors down through the trailers mast to the trailers panel. You can use number six aluminum for the connection between the bare drop conductor and the Equipment Grounding Conductor Buss in the trailers panel. If there is no bare buss sitting directly on the back wall of the trailer panel cabinet then buy one and install it. The Quad plex usually has colored tracer stripes on the insulation of the conductors. Color code the three insulated number two aluminum wires that go through the head and down to the trailers panel lugs white, red, and leave one black. The wires that go to the trailers panel lugs go black on the left, red on the right and white on the insulated Grounded Conductor buss. Remove any bonding screw or strap that connects the insulated Grounded Conductor buss to the trailer panel's cabinet.

Install a grounding electrode system at the trailer. The minimum is two ground rods spaced six feet apart and connected to the trailer's panel's bare un insulated EGC buss with bare number six copper. Better is to space them ten feet apart and ten feet from the trailer and connect them to the trailers panel EGC buss with bare number two copper. The ground rods in the second case are driven through the bottom of a trench that is twenty feet long and three feet deep. The bare number two copper is run in the bottom of that trench and through a schedule 80 plastic conduit up to the trailers panel cabinet.

Please note! The code would allow you to run the feeder from the service equipment to the trailer's panel as three conductor rather than four. That is cheaper and simpler to wire but the way I have outlined the job would be best practice. I say that because your web sight pictures make it clear that you have outbuildings and you mentioned that you will have a branch circuit that supplies a well pump. Using four wires makes any problems with stray neutral currents far less likely. I thought you might want to avoid the posibility of the thrill of having arcing at your gas piping due to stray neutral currents. Remember to bond the frame of the trailer to the grounding electrodes.
--
Tom
 
  #5  
Old 08-29-02, 03:53 PM
WhaleMstr
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Wow TOM! Talk about a mouthfull! Hope you took a breath when you did all that!?!?!? LOLOL

Okay, after reading what you posted, I need to fill you in on a few more things. The power pole itself is grounded with an 8' copper rod that my wife and I drove in. Believe me when I say we did this! It took us forever to put that pole in!

As to the trailer, there is no ground rod yet, but I am thinking that I am going to run another 8' ground rod into the ground and tie into it somehow. The service panel in the trailer and the weatherhead are already there and all were used in the past. The weatherhead coming out of the trailer even has the wires still coming out and all they did was clip them off. I should get another picture of just that to show. The insulator you mention is already there too, and it even faces the power pole!

From what I read, I need to get Quadplex? Is that something that if I go into a supply house and say "I need 60' of Quadplex", they aren't going to turn around and split a gut laughing? LOL
The distance from the weatherhead in the trailer, to the side of the power pole is 47' BTW. The wife and I measured it this AM.

It will take me a few minutes more to soak all this in, but I think you got me on the right track for sure Tom. I will read and re-read it until I am positive I totally understand it all. Then, I'll probably have a ton more questions!! LOL

Thanks again,
Dan
 
  #6  
Old 08-29-02, 06:57 PM
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Glad to help.

I am glad you found my suggestions helpful.
You need to pay careful attention to your grounding and bonding. It is the heart and sole of electrical safety for your family. A single ground rod at the pole or at the house is not enough. Please reread my grounding sugestions and try to find the energy and time to do at least one of the major grounding electrodes. Hire a back hoe for one half day and put in a ground ring around the pole footer.

How many wires are hanging out of the weather head? If there are only three be prepared to add the number six Equipment Grounding Conductor and the additional EGC buss in the house panel.

As for asking for the wire you need at a supply house just don't try to pretend that you know all of the terms or techniques. Tell the clerk you are working from a list provided by others and let them help you. Quad plex is an assembly of insulated aluminum wires pre wrapped around an aluminum clad steel reinforced (ACSR) combination conductor and messenger wire. It is used for single phase overhead feeders and three phase service drops. The wire the utility will use to bring the service to your yard pole is called tryplex because it has only three conductors one of which is also the messenger.
--
Tom
 
  #7  
Old 08-29-02, 07:08 PM
bwetzel
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I hate to be the one who breaks the bad news Tom, but what about 550-23 of the NEC. Where is the disconect since the service equipment is 45 feet away. 550-23-a, States the mobile home service equipment shall be located adjacent to the mobile home and not mounted in or on the mobile home. The service equipment shall be located in sight from and not more than 30 feet from the exterior wall of the mobile home it serves. The service equipment shall be permitted to be located elsewhere on the premises, provided that a disconnecting means suitable for service equipment is located in sight from and not more than 30' This means you will need to install a disconect switch. My suggestion is to ask the inspector Electrical inspector not building inspector)if he will allow the additional 15'. As long as it is still "within sight" he may ok it. I would hate for you to do all of this work and It is shot down because of 15'
You did say that the meter is 45' away right?
 

Last edited by bwetzel; 08-29-02 at 08:34 PM.
  #8  
Old 08-29-02, 08:06 PM
GodsBeast
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by WhaleMstr
[B]Wow TOM! Talk about a mouthfull! Hope you took a breath when you did all that!?!?!? LOLOL

Okay, after reading what you posted, I need to fill you in on a few more things. The power pole itself is grounded with an 8' copper rod that my wife and I drove in. Believe me when I say we did this! It took us forever to put that pole in!

Hey WhaleMstr, I don't mean to be a late butt in, but when I seen you had problems with putting that pole in, I am not sure, which pole you are talking about, (The utility pole or the ground rod) but I did some Line work when I was younger and thought I'd give you a tip. Down here in Louisiana, we can sink an 8' copper ground rod with a bucket of water, by pouring a little water on the ground where you stab it, then pull it back up and fill the hole with water, restab it trying to sink it a few more inches each time, every time you pull it back up, fill the hole with water, then restab, till it is sunk all the way. It realize that the soil in your area may not be like ours here, but give it a try, if it works like it does down here, it really is not that difficult.
So far as the Utility Pole, the ones I used to climb, we had boom trucks to put them in, but I did put some mobile home pole in, which I dug the holes a little larger than the pole, rolled the pole till I got one end over the hole, go to the other end pick up and walk towards the hole while continuing to lift the pole (we call it, walking the pole, till the end over the hole falls down into the hole. Whatever you do, watch the pole, don't try to grab it, when it starts down, no matter what direction, if you ever make that mistake, you won't ever make it again
So far as the other stuff, The other guys are giving you good advise, you may consider using the larger wire, in case you decide to add on additional things later, like a shop, etc. Either way I hope I shared a tip, if not, I apoligize for waisting your time, good luck with your project!
 
  #9  
Old 08-29-02, 08:50 PM
WhaleMstr
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Okay guys, I'll try to answer this as best as I can.

The weatherhead has 4 wires sticking out of it.

The head of the STATE of CALIFORNIA building department stated: "If the trailer was built with the weatherhead coming out of the interior, and nothing has been modified or otherwise changed with it, then it is not necessary to install a disconnect outside of the trailer. They may use the existing weatherhead and directly connect to the utility power pole."

Okay, lets see what else.
The existing wiring in the trailer was updated to 12/2 sometime ago, so it's all up to snuff inside.
The local building department has stated that the power pole with an 8' - 1/2"dia. ground rod is apparently enough for them!
My plan is to add another ground rod near the trailer and hook it up to the plumbing line that's under there. It looks like there had been one there previously - there is one of those clamps there already.
I am also planning on putting another one under the trailer and hooking it up to the ground strap in the main box in the trailer.

I hope this makes sense and is clear as mud???
I am trying to make sure that the place is grounded as much as I can get away with.

As to hiring a backhoe - I have already put 3 days on one of those and 5 days into 2 cats to get what I got done there as it is. Trying to dig anything around that power pole is impossible - a jack-hammer is what it would take. If you happened to notice - the 4' square - 1' deep concrete ring around it?? That's because we could not dig the hole for the power pole 4.5' deep!! The wife and I worked for 3 and a half days on that hole with a very large steel bar and shovels and picks and... and we only made it 3.5' deep. I called the power company and told them and they told me I could do the concrete thing! I think it was about 25 or so 90 pound bags of concrete.

Okay, enough of that - anyway, thanks for all this help guys - I totally appreciate this!!

Later,
Dan
 
  #10  
Old 08-29-02, 09:31 PM
bwetzel
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by WhaleMstr
[B]Okay guys, I'll try to answer this as best as I can.


The head of the STATE of CALIFORNIA building department stated: "If the trailer was built with the weatherhead coming out of the interior, and nothing has been modified or otherwise changed with it, then it is not necessary to install a disconnect outside of the trailer. They may use the existing weatherhead and directly connect to the utility power pole."

The local building department has stated that the power pole with an 8' - 1/2"dia. ground rod is apparently enough for them!
My plan is to add another ground rod near the trailer and hook it up to the plumbing line that's under there. It looks like there had been one there previously - there is one of those clamps there already.
I am also planning on putting another one under the trailer and hooking it up to the ground strap in the main box in the trailer.


The problem I am having with this discussion is the fact that you keep saying you are talking with the building dept. and the power co. If it is not the electrical inspector it does not matter. The NEC has codes for reasons. The only way you can run the service into this weatherhead is if the service equipment is within 30' and within sight. As for grounding, You are required to have a grounding electrode system that includes all (If available) of the following to be bonded together
metal underground water pipe 10' or longer,metal frame of building,concrete-encased electrode,or a ground ring. If you have a waterpipe you must have a secondary electrode. This can be your ground rods. 250-56 States that if you cannot achieve 25 ohms(which is almost impossible) you must install a second ground rod no less then 6' apart. This would be at your 200amp service panel on the pole.
As far as the mobile home, You need to have a disconect means within 30'. Regardless when this was built, You are installing a new service to this and it must be installed under the NEC guidlines. Print this out and show it to the Electrical Inspector. It is his job to tell you what he will accept. You asked for help and I gave you the code ref. You then tell me that the head of Cali. says it is ok not to install this under NEC rules. Sounds like you have enough help. Sorry I couldn't help you.
 
  #11  
Old 08-29-02, 09:57 PM
WhaleMstr
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Bwetzel - I totally appreciate everything you have told me. Now, I have to figure out WHO the electrical inspector is?? I have never been told there is one or there is going to be one or anything!

I have been talking with every permit person under the sun on this project, at least everyone that anyones told me I had to deal with! Man, now you tell me I gotta go looking for another one!?!?

I am getting more confused as the days get shorter!! LOL

As to the power pole. it's 47' from the trailer weatherhead and totally within site. The trailer panel has a 100A main and the power pole - I bought a 200A service for the future.

Everytime I ask somebody in the building department what to do about this, they tell me that I need to have a disconnect within 3' of the trailer. But, I would have to take the weatherhead out, then run the interior wiring down through a hole I drilled in the floor, and then run that under the trailer in conduit over to the disconnect pole and then trench a line to the main power pole.

That's what was confusing me when I talked with them. Everytime I asked them if that's what they wanted me to do, they couldn't answer! That's why the local inspector called the main office and talked with them.

So at this point, I have been told that all I need to do is run an over-head line from the new main pole to the weatherhead on the trailer.

Do you understand some of my confusion here??
Thanks for your words of wisdom!
Dan
 
  #12  
Old 08-29-02, 10:36 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Indiana
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Grounding

Something’s I agree with, The service equipment would have to meet the grounding requirements of Article 250, but the feeders supplying the trailer are to meet the requirements of 550. Requiring the grounding conductor to be ran with the feeders, and be green insulated.

As far as the important question:http://www.geocities.com/arthurphare...?1030690475380
 
  #13  
Old 08-29-02, 11:16 PM
WhaleMstr
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I missed your post GodsBeast - to let you know what type of ground we have there-----

When me wife and I had the pole hole down the 3.5' that we did, everyone kept telling me that I should put water in it to loosen things up and that would do it. Well, we knew better, and since I knew that we were leaving for a few days, I decided that I better do it anyway just so we would all know what would happen. Well, I put 1' of water in the hole and we left.

We came back 6 days later. I "measured" how much was STILL in the hole - 4"s!!!! That's after 6 days of 100 degree heat!!

I tried slamming the pry bar in to see if anything loosened up - NO LUCK!! The ground in that area is a type of volcanic ash that turned to concrete over the eons! To give you an idea of how tuff it is, one of the cats that was working out there was a D6. It had a set of ripper bars on it - they were 6"s square and solid steel! The guy BROKE one off trying to rip that area to level it up!!

As to setting the pole. When it was delivered, it was loaded on top of a lumber yard delivery truck with a bunch of other stuff on the truck. There was only the driver and myself - and I have a very bad back too! Anyway, I had him move the truck up above the hole on one of the roads I have out there, and had him back it up to the edge. We loosened it up and then I climbed all the way up and held the pole so the power box and weatherhead didn't get torn off on the way down. I had already dug a groove in the bank above the hole where I was hoping the pole would go. Once we loosened it and started it sliding, it slid right on down, into the groove, and into the hole like I had planned it! The driver was totally amazed!! Actually, so was I!!

The next day, I drove a couple of steel bars into the ground around it, and then screwed 1x4's into them, then I just started shoving it around until I had the box level and then screwed it in place! It all worked out great as far as the setting went!

Aphares: Thanks for finally showing me the truth of the matter!! LOLOL

Later,
Dan

PS. Is there a web site that shows those code numbers you guys are refering to?
 
  #14  
Old 08-30-02, 12:51 AM
GodsBeast
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Yes sir ry, WhaleMstr, The ground your describing if a far cry different than these lowland swampy areas! I know what ya mean, when your at the bottom of a mountain, trying to get a loaded wagon to the top, with a good mule, and no hitching harness. Right now I feel like the good mule, Stong Back, Weak Mind, in the way, and unable to help. Years ago I worked on a linecrew, I had two nicknames "Hulk" and "Bull", so you can guess what type of work they always called me for! Wish I could help! Like Marty Robbins sang "Lord this time you gave me a mountain" I have faith you'll climb it.
 
  #15  
Old 08-30-02, 04:42 AM
hornetd's Avatar
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Originally posted by bwetzel
I hate to be the one who breaks the bad news Tom, but what about 550-23 of the NEC. Where is the disconect since the service equipment is 45 feet away. 550-23-a, States the mobile home service equipment shall be located adjacent to the mobile home and not mounted in or on the mobile home. The service equipment shall be located in sight from and not more than 30 feet from the exterior wall of the mobile home it serves. The service equipment shall be permitted to be located elsewhere on the premises, provided that a disconnecting means suitable for service equipment is located in sight from and not more than 30' This means you will need to install a disconect switch. My suggestion is to ask the inspector Electrical inspector not building inspector)if he will allow the additional 15'. As long as it is still "within sight" he may ok it. I would hate for you to do all of this work and It is shot down because of 15'
You did say that the meter is 45' away right?
I am sorry I caused confusion by calling the home a trailer and thus implying that it is a "mobile home." If you look at the photographs you will see that it is in fact a manufactured home. A manufactured home can have its service equipment built in under subsection B of the section you mentioned. viz.

550.32 Service Equipment.
(B) Manufactured Home Service Equipment. The manufactured home service equipment shall be permitted to be installed in or on a manufactured home, provided that all of the following conditions are met:
(1) The manufacturer shall include in its written installation instructions information indicating that the home shall be secured in place by an anchoring system or installed on and secured to a permanent foundation.
(2) The installation of the service equipment shall comply with Article 230.
(3) Means shall be provided for the connection of a grounding electrode conductor to the service equipment and routing it outside the structure.
(4) Bonding and grounding of the service shall be in accordance with Article 250.
(5) The manufacturer shall include in its written installation instructions one method of grounding the service equipment at the installation site. The instructions shall clearly state that other methods of grounding are found in Article 250.
(6) The minimum size grounding electrode conductor shall be specified in the instructions.
(7) A red warning label shall be mounted on or adjacent to the service equipment. The label shall state the following:
WARNING DO NOT PROVIDE ELECTRICAL POWER UNTIL THE GROUNDING ELECTRODE(S) IS INSTALLED AND CONNECTED (SEE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS).
Where the service equipment is not installed in or on the unit, the installation shall comply with the other provisions of this section.
--
Tom
 
  #16  
Old 08-30-02, 05:16 AM
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Grounding for your home.

I had another thought on the grounding. I know that you said that your well is 250 feet away but is the well casing metallic? Is the water line by chance metallic? Are you are going to dig a trench to run the wires to the well?

The trench needs to be two feet deep for direct buried conductors. You will use a back hoe for this trench correct? Just have them dig the first twenty or more feet at least two and one half feet deep. Then you lay twenty feet of #2 (code allows #6) bare copper in the trench connected to two ground rods that you also lay in the trench. One ground rod is at the start of the trench and the other is at least six feet away but better at the end of the deeper portion or at least the length of the rod apart. The further you run the bare number two the better the ground will be. The reason that you need the rods is to comply with the letter of the code. No matter how long it is if the number two bare copper does not encircle the building it is not considered a grounding electrode.
--
Tom
 
  #17  
Old 08-30-02, 10:57 AM
WhaleMstr
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Tom - Awesome info!

Okay let's see, the well casing is PVC, and yes, I am going to run wires underground up to it. The piping in the house itself is metal, and where it comes out under the unit is where I mentioned that there was a pre-existing clamp. My guess is that it is where a previous installation had been grounded.

I am still trying to figure out what size and kind of wire to bury up to the well. BTW, I plan on putting another ground rod up by the well, so I can ground that area also.

As to the 2.5' deep trenching - Is this close to the home you are refering to, or up by the well? I am guessing you mean by the home - with the 2 rods spaced 6' apart and connected to a bare #2 - 20' long copper wire?

Man - for a guy that's on unemplyment, with only 2 checks left, and 3 kids to take care of, and 35% disabled, and a stay at home dad, this is getting more and more confusing and expensive as the typing goes on!!

We won't be able to even afford a back-hoe again for maybe months and months! I am probably going to have to run the pump wiring above the ground until I can get it buried! Once we get a Cert of Occ. ( and according to them, I only have a couple of things to take care of ), then they pretty much are out of the picture. It's pretty weird? All the people out there say the same thing too. It's like once you get the county crap done, you are free to do what you want!

Don't get me wrong, one of the reasons why we are broke, is that I have put so much effort into making this place as legal and safe as I possibly can. I put all the cat work and back-hoe work into the place because all the other places out there are basically small pads cut into the hillside. Enough room for a manufactured home and to park a car or two. I had a septic system put in that's sized for a 4 bedroom home. Right now we have a 3 bedroom mobile. Everything I have done is for the future of the place. I want to be able to sell the place with the understanding that anyone buying it will be getting a piece of property that is legal, well thought out, expandable, and ready to have a newer custom home or mobile put on it.

Heck, the garden area alone is fenced and it's 112' x 36' with an area of about 8 to 12' to walk all around it. I cut an area into the bank for a 24' x 38' greenhouse to be built. Another area cut into the bank for a very large chicken coop too!

The orchard area we have is huge, and I have so many roads out there now that when the fire marshal came out we joked about the fact that if there was ever a fire in the area, that my property would be the one they set up all their equipment at!! Also, it would get really crowded because everybody in the area would be running to our place because it's the only one that's totally fire defendable because of how I had all the cat work done!

All that's keeping us from moving out there permanently and not just "camping" is the power! I think I am getting closer on how this is all going to go together now thanks to all that you guys are telling me. Even if I never see an electrical inspector, I am hoping that it will all be done correctly. When the building inspector checked the grounds in the mobile, they found only 1 light switch and 1 plug-in that needed to be checked, so that's a good sign!

Anyway,
THANKS AGAIN!!
Dan
 
  #18  
Old 08-30-02, 11:52 AM
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What's in a name.

A rose by any other name may smell as sweet but a manufactured home when called a mobile home comes under different rules. I would suggest you make it a habit to refer to it as a manufactured home because that is what permits the disconnecting means to be located inside the building.

As for the grounding, yes, I was referring to the end by the home. The first thirty feet of the trench for the well wiring should be dug to two and one half to three feet. You run the bare number two copper in the bottom of the trench from the grounded conductor buss in the homes panel until it is at least twenty feet out in the trench. This is called the Grounding Electrode Conductor. You connect the first rod to it by running the GEC through the acorn clamp on the rod. The far end of it gets connected to the end of the second ground rod that sticks out beyond it into the rest of the trench.

I understand that money is tight but if you can go the distance you should run out in the bottom of the trench a distance equal to the outside dimension around your house. Running that much bare number two copper buried in the earth will give you a much superior ground. As I mentioned before if the number two copper actually circled the building the code would not require the ground rods. The code does not require more than the two rods at least six feet apart connected with number six and that would certainly cost less. If you want to substitute sweat for money then Use only enough number two to place the two rods ten feet apart but drive the rods straight down through the bottom of the trench. That grounding electrode will be much better than minimum without turning into a budget buster. If you can afford the rental on a hammer drill with a ground rod cup it makes driving the rods a lot easier.
--
Tom
 
  #19  
Old 08-30-02, 12:08 PM
WhaleMstr
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Tom, I wasn't planning on connecting the well wiring to the house panel at all. I am going to connect it to the main service panel at the power pole. The panel has room in it for about 8 more circuits, and that's how all my neighbors have theirs, so I figured I would follow suit.

I thought, that running the 4 wires up to the well, I would be carrying the ground with the line. Same thing with the wires running from the power pole to the weatherhead on the "manufactured home"!

I was thinking that the extra ground rods would be just that, "extra" insurance.

I really appreciate all you've helped me with.
Thanks again,
Dan

PS. - Tom, I can't even afford to pay attention!!
 
  #20  
Old 08-30-02, 12:24 PM
hornetd's Avatar
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Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Maryland
Posts: 695
A trench is a trench

Originally posted by WhaleMstr
Tom, I wasn't planning on connecting the well wiring to the house panel at all. I am going to connect it to the main service panel at the power pole. The panel has room in it for about 8 more circuits, and that's how all my neighbors have theirs, so I figured I would follow suit.

I thought, that running the 4 wires up to the well, I would be carrying the ground with the line. Same thing with the wires running from the power pole to the weatherhead on the "manufactured home"!

I was thinking that the extra ground rods would be just that, "extra" insurance.

I really appreciate all you've helped me with.
Thanks again,
Dan

PS. - Tom, I can't even afford to pay attention!!
Just do the same thing in that trench and make the conection to the service equipment bonded buss bar.
--
Tom
 
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