Replacing GFI breaker with regular

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Old 10-08-00, 02:01 PM
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When my house was built, it was common practice to put bathroom and outside outlets on a circuit with a GFI breaker. The receptacles were non-GFI. My breaker keeps tripping now, and I can find no reason for it other than old age. I've already replaced the receptacles on the circuit with GFI receptacles, and would like to replace this GFI breaker with a regular one.

A regular single-pole 20-amp breaker only has one connection, for the black wire. The GFI breaker I'm replacing has three, one for the black, and two for white wires. What do I do with these? Leave them disconnected?

This is a Zinsco breaker. It's a double height, with the toggle switch above the test button as you look at it horizontally. The black wire connects at the same level as the toggle switch, and the whites at each end of the level with the test button. I'm assuming the whites have to do with the ground fault function.
 
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Old 10-08-00, 02:20 PM
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Just connect the black to the new breaker,
and the white to the neutral bus.

Originally, the white would connect the the GFCI breaker as well as the black, and another lead would connect the GFCI to
the neutral bus.
 
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Old 10-08-00, 02:29 PM
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gary Tait:
Just connect the black to the new breaker,
and the white to the neutral bus.

Originally, the white would connect the the GFCI breaker as well as the black, and another lead would connect the GFCI to
the neutral bus.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

OK, so since one of the whites already connects to the neutral bus, all I have to do it just connect the other white to it? Thanks.
 
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Old 10-08-00, 04:04 PM
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The white that is already connected to the neutral bar is also molded into the breaker. Just remove that white wire that is molded to the breaker and connect the white wire of the branch circuit to the neutral bar.

Now just to add some words for thought you age of the house tends to make me believe that your gaskest on your weatherproof plates on your outside receptacles are dried up and allowing moisture to enter your outside receptacles. I suggest that you buy some silicone calking and pull off these plates and run the caulking to the plate and sqeeze it to the wall and remount the plate with the screw. This should weatherproof the receptacle again and maybe solve your GFI kicking problem. I also suggest that you may have a hair dryer or other appliance that has a build up of graphite from its brushes located in the motor of the appliance. If this is so then replace the appliance. Moisture tends to be obsorbed by the graphite dust built up in the appliance causing a reading for the GFI and causing it to kick also. These two scenerios tend to be the most common culprit in causing GFI trippings in older homes.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
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