2 nd phone line....

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  #1  
Old 10-19-00, 07:32 PM
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Ugghh...I'm trying to get my second line working on an extension now wired for line 1. The line one wires were blue and blue \white. I checked the wires in our office for line 2 and they are orange and orange/white. So I replaced the blue with the orange wires but didn't get any tone. I went to the basement to see if I could trace that extension back to the phone box but we have so many extensions in the house and all the wires come out of the cellar ceiling twist-tied together. What do you recommend, aside from having the phone company out??

Thank you in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-20-00, 06:53 AM
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There are a couple of ways to handle this. If there are not too many wires, and you get to decide this for yourself, then you can just connect all the blue pairs to the first line, and all the orange pairs to the second line. This will probably make both lines available in all your phone jacks by just hooking up the desired pair. In fact, you could then have both lines hooked up on all jacks by hooking the orange pair to the black and yellow posts on all the jacks. There are 2-line splitters that will split out line 1 and line 2 for you, and 2-line phones would plug right in.

If there are more wires and/or a bunch of abandoned old wires, so you don't want to do the above, you can either get a circuit tracer or use a volt-ohm meter to find the right wire. A circuit tracer has a signal injector that you would attach to the orange pair of wires at the jack where you want line 2. Then the other part will pick up that signal from the wire in the basement that goes to that location. Be sure to unhook both incoming phone lines before doing a signal trace. If you accidently get on the wrong pair you don't want to be injecting signal out to the phone company's lines.

If you don't have, or can't borrow a signal tracer, you can just short the pair together at the jack and look for the shorted pair among the wires in the basement. It's more tedious, but serves the same purpose as a signal tracer. Again, unhook both incoming phone lies while doing this. In this case, the incoming phone line will interfere with the ohm-meter reading if you check a pair that is already hooked up.
 
  #3  
Old 10-20-00, 09:19 AM
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ranck gave you a lot of good troubleshooting ideas.

The ultimate goal of course is to make a connection from the box on the side of your house all the way to your phone. It doesn't really matter what color the wires are as long as the connection exists.

Testing is important because you cannot see much of the wiring in the wall, so you have to infer this wiring from your testing.

One thing to watch out for is not to interchange tip and ring (i.e., the two wires to the phone). The phone won't work unless the polarity is correct. So if you get to where you're sure it should work but it doesn't, you might want to try switching the two wires to see if that makes a difference.

Good luck with this rat's nest.
 
  #4  
Old 10-20-00, 10:24 AM
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Just thought i would add a word of caution here even though this is low voltage be careful if you should get a phone call while hooking up wires you can get a pretty good jolt as the wire carries 50+volts at least.Have seen as much as 120 volts on a phone line and add the experience of pulling our phone lady loose form a phone line one time so test and be careful
 
  #5  
Old 10-20-00, 01:05 PM
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Actually, John Nelson, tip and ring do not matter so much any more. It's still good practice to keep them straight, but most new phones don't care, and even the old Bell system touchtones that were sensitive to it will still get dial-tone if tip and ring is reversed. They just won't dial out.

As for the ring voltage that Doc mentions. I think the nominal ring voltage is 100VAC. It varies a lot, and it is pretty low current, but that's another good reason to disconnect the phone line at the network interface while testing.
 
  #6  
Old 10-20-00, 06:39 PM
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ranck, I think you're right about tip and ring not being that important for a simple analog phone. But I don't think a modem will work on a phone line with tip and ring reversed, and I would worry about such features as caller id. I would also worry about electronic phones that don't really use the line voltage to produce the ringing.

Anyway, you should probably get it right on general principle.
 
  #7  
Old 10-22-00, 08:31 AM
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I think that I have a simpler method if you are extremly lucky! Go to you connection box where your phone company connects to your structure wiring, usually by the meterbase outside. You should be able to open this box and see which wires are for line one and which wires are for line two. The phone company usually will be using the normal color coded wire that your phone jack is using. Just match the colors the stucture wires are conected to the phone company wires and you should have what you need at the phone jack for both phone lines.

Hope this idea helps

Wg
 
  #8  
Old 10-22-00, 02:03 PM
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Most modern telephone electronics use full wave bridge rectifiers to connect to the line, so line polarity is no longer an issue.
 
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