Base board heat

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  #1  
Old 10-09-00, 10:01 PM
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I was wondering if anyone new if base board heat can be used with a programmable thermostat. My old thermostat has only 2 wires, and I am a real novice, and the instructions for the new thermostat has a lot more wiring diagrams. Any help would be great!!!!

Thanks a bunch.
 
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Old 10-10-00, 08:26 AM
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Baseboard heat could be either electric or hot water. Which do you have? If it's electric baseboard, the thermostat must be a high voltage type. If it's hot water, then a low voltage type is used. Are the 2 wires small "bell wire" or thicker power type wire?

All the programmable thermostats I have seen are the low voltage type. Does not mean there aren't high voltage programmables, I've just never seen one.
 
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Old 10-10-00, 03:30 PM
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The only way I can think of to use a low voltage programmable thermostat on a high voltage 220 volt heating system like baseboard heat is to place the programmable thermostat in the room you want to control the baseboard heat. Run the low voltage output to a jbox large enough to accept a relay in the jbox. Place a two pole 240 volt relay with a magnetic coil controling the relay that is compatible with the low voltage output of your programmable thermostat. The low voltage thermostat would call for heat closing the low voltage output running to the magnetic coil pulling in the contactor of the relay that has a two pole set of contacts which would close by the pull of the low voltage magnetic coil. This would energize the baseboard heaters.

Hope this helps.

Wg
 
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Old 10-26-00, 11:59 AM
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Questions on this last post.
All three heaters equal 16.7 amp. (4000 Watts) (240)
1. The relay is rated for 25A RESISTIVE NON-INDUCTIVE and only 12A MOTOR INDUCTIVE, FULL LOAD.

Which should I be looking at? Is this relay ok?

2. Is it ok to use only one relay (in a metal junction box) and work the three heaters in paralel off of there?

3. Anything I should know?

Thanks,

Pete
 
  #5  
Old 10-26-00, 01:13 PM
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DippinPete:
Questions on this last post.
All three heaters equal 16.7 amp. (4000 Watts) (240)
1. The relay is rated for 25A RESISTIVE NON-INDUCTIVE and only 12A MOTOR INDUCTIVE, FULL LOAD.

Which should I be looking at? Is this relay ok?

2. Is it ok to use only one relay (in a metal junction box) and work the three heaters in paralel off of there?

3. Anything I should know?

Thanks,

Pete
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Electric baseboard heaters are a resistive load. So, you can use that rating. You say that the 3 heaters are 16.7 Amps. Is that per heater, or added together? If it's per heater, you should have one relay for each one. So you would probably have a small relay controlled by the thermostat, that would then control the other 3 relays for the heaters.

If all 3 combined are 16.7 amp, then you could parallel them off this one relay. Does the relay have a low-voltage coil? That is the part the activates it. That is what you need for directly controling it with the thermostat. This is different than the contact ratings that you gave.
 
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Old 10-26-00, 01:40 PM
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:-) Thanks for the info!!! And thank you for the fast reply!

Yes, all three together are 16.7A (not each)
... the relay has five total wires, Blue, Black, and Yellow (These three are for the line and heater(s). And then two more for t-stat (low-voltage) (red and white).

I think you answered the question!! I was pretty sure I could run them all off one!!

Thanks for the info!!

Pete
 
  #7  
Old 10-26-00, 03:06 PM
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Here's another point of wonder on this matter!!

The relay/transformer is rated for 25A, if this is so, then why are the line in/out wires 12ga.?

Anyone on this one??

Pete
 
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Old 10-26-00, 08:31 PM
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The wires coming from the unit are short and are considered taps. There are tap rules associated to most anything from ranges, recessed fixtures, etc. The same association is found when you run 12 ga. through the dwelling to go to receptacles, yet everthing such as table lamps have a 16 ga cord on them. This is allowed due to the tap rules and the short length of wire on the tails or cords. Look in your NEC for tap rules pertaining to fixture taps.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
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