Need a junction box outside.

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  #1  
Old 09-20-02, 09:42 AM
K
kherman
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Question Need a junction box outside.

Hi, this is my first post. Been looking for a forum like this for a while.

Basically. I want do outdoor lighting(120V). I can do everything outside, but I am having trouble finding information on how to get power outside.

The exterior of my house is vinyl siding. I have a source on the inside of the house I want to use (a light switch). I want to put a junction box outside, connected to a switch on the inside. So, I will tap off the exisiting switch, to a new switch which will be located directly next to the existing switch, which has to go to an exterior junction box. How do I pull the cable from the inside to the outside, through the wall? Even better yet, My exterior walls are insulated (6").

I need to know what parts I need. What type of cable to use, etc.

Also, I intend to bury the cable without conduit outside. Is this OK? What kind of cable should I use outdoors? What is the minimum depth to bury it?

The more I think about it, the more I think I should just take a portion of the drywall off (stud width), run the wiring, and then just put the drywall back up and refinish it.

Any help is appreciated.
Thanks,
karl
 
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  #2  
Old 09-20-02, 10:49 AM
G
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Two points:

1. Outside circuitry must be protected with a Ground Fault Interrupt device (GFI). Typically a GFI breaker in the main panel.
Alternately extend an existing GFI protected circuit.

2. Unless the power feed line servicing the outlets, lights, etc that are controlled by the switch pass through the switch box you cannot pull power from that point. Just because the wires are black and white does not mean they are line and nuetral. If all you see is a single pair of wires in the switch box don't use them.
 
  #3  
Old 09-20-02, 11:00 AM
K
kherman
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Talking Found the "correct way" of doing this.



I actually sat down for a while looking for documentation on how to do this. I've tried on again and off again, but this time I finally found it!

Here's a good link on how to do it the easy way.
Well, it might cost a bit more in wire, but....it's woprth it in my humble opinion. I can just go through the basement and not worry about refinishing drywall and no GFI issues to worry about other than doing oit correctly from the breaker box.

Thanks for the reply though.
 
  #4  
Old 09-21-02, 06:16 AM
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sknyfs
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Originally posted by gsharpe


2. Just because the wires are black and white does not mean they are line and nuetral. If all you see is a single pair of wires in the switch box don't use them.
Why is this?
 
  #5  
Old 09-21-02, 07:49 AM
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Gary Tait
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Because it is what is called a switch loop, where power is at the
light fixture,with one lead in a two wire cable (should be the white one), feeding hot power to the switch, and the other wire
sending switched power back to the light fixture. I that situation,
you will have no current return for any load you may attempt
to connect to a switch loop, without connection in series with the
lamp, and being disconnected when the switch is turned on.
 
  #6  
Old 09-21-02, 09:25 AM
J
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Assuming that the white wire in a switch loop is a neutral is probably the most common DIY wiring mistake made.
 
  #7  
Old 09-22-02, 09:46 AM
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sknyfs
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So you are saying this will not work because the outlet is controlled by a switch. Therefore, if my outlet isn't controlled by a switch (which it isn't) I shold be able to tap power from there.
 
  #8  
Old 09-22-02, 02:14 PM
J
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An unswitched receptacle is usually the best place to tap power from. There are restrictions that usually prohibit this if the receptacle is ungrounded, or is in a bathroom, kitchen, laundry room, dining room, or pantry. And of course, you want to make sure the new fixture or receptacle will not overload the circuit that the receptacle is on.

But you can sometimes tap power from a switched receptacle too. There are two main ways to wire a switched receptacle (or light), and only one uses a switch loop. If you have a switch loop, you can tap power from the receptacle but not the switch. If you do not have a switch loop, you can tap power from the switch.

One key thing to consider is that in almost any wiring situation, the person who wired it had a number of valid choices in how to do it. If you need to modify the wiring, you must first figure out what choices were made by the person who did it originally.
 
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