Panel Mounting

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Old 09-26-02, 05:26 AM
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Panel Mounting

My service panel is mounted on a 3/4" plywood panel (floor to ceiling) in the basement.
I heard panels must be mounted on concrete or drywall or any non-flamable surface.
Do I have a problem?
 
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Old 09-26-02, 07:33 AM
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Never heard of such a restriction. Anybody else?
 
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Old 09-26-02, 08:12 AM
MTgets
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Me either, in fact that is the standard way of mounting panels in a lot of areas. It sure comes in handy when you are trying to install a new panel over an 150 year old fieldstone basement wall.
 
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Old 09-26-02, 08:30 AM
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Makes it great to staple wire to also.
 
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Old 09-26-02, 10:34 AM
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MTgets, unbelievable coincedence - I hung a 3/4" plywood backplane for a new 150 amp panel over a filedstone basement wall! Just had to say something.

Juice
 
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Old 09-26-02, 11:44 AM
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Thanks!

Many thanks for your responses regarding using a plywood backboard.
The advantages seem obvious.
Ok...here's were I read this...the Home Depot Electrical Wiring book.
It's seemed stupid...but I had to run it past this forum. The author implied this was a code requirement.
THIS is the place to get acurate information....forget Home Depot advice.

-Bill
 
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Old 09-26-02, 12:32 PM
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I was told in Ontario where I live the you need it to be mounted on a fire break. That means a piece of drywall behind the panel if it is mounted to plywood. It can be exactly the same size as the panel so that it is basicly invisible.
 
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Old 09-26-02, 01:33 PM
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Call your local building department for local codes.
 
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Old 09-26-02, 08:07 PM
Lew Falconer
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panel mount in Ontario

Hi folks. The code in all of Ontario for mounting service panels was changed about 8 or 10 years ago. The panel can be mounted on plywood with drywall between the plywood and panel. (Same size as panel to facilitate staples into plywood) OR it can be mounted directly to fire grade plywood and the firegrade stamp must be visable after installation. We Canucks just have to be a little different don't we.
Have a good day: it's good to be back.
 
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Old 09-26-02, 11:31 PM
FREDDYG_001
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wmozer, I've always based it on the type and condition of wall surface (brick, block, slab and how even it was). Like john was saying contact your AHJ on this issue if your still unsure.


Fred
 
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Old 09-30-02, 11:44 AM
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Some localities, regardless of country, have specific rules and have their own electrical code, because of experiences and history of problems. In Chicago for instance, where the City burned to the ground once upon a time, they do not allow type NM cable, or Romex as many of us call it. Everything is in pipe per local Code.

With regard to your panel requirement though, most folks will agree that long before a properly installed and inspected breaker panel will actually catch on fire, the main breaker will kick. But for added assurance, having a fireproof backplane ensures that fire won't spread unecessarily fast. But heat rises, and the fire will shoot straight up to my 125 year old joists long before it burns through my backplane setting my fieldstone basement wall on fire!!! Go figure. Local Codes, although they may seem arbitrary to you, prevail and you gotta do what they say you gotta do.

Anyway, I have had a positive experience after pulling an inspection application, and after first obtaining my permit with the local Code Enforcement officer, being able to call the actual guy who will inspect it and having him/her say "this is what I'm going to be looking for". I believe you can't go wrong going this route. Unless you're doing it yourself where your locality does not permit homeowners to do their own electrical work. Mine does.

Hope that helps.

Juice
 
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