convert hardwired oven to plug

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  #1  
Old 10-02-02, 09:05 AM
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garafola
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convert hardwired oven to plug

I need to replace my 1975 hard wired free standing range.
I wanted to disconnect the range and put a receptacle there.

Do I put in a 3 prong or a 4 prong, or is this just for dryers?
Can I buy a 3 prong cord for a new oven.
Can anyone give me the basics on for the new connections of the wires I should find in the JB upon opening it?
Or should I just try to hard wire my new range? (haven't bought it yet)

Thanks for any help.

garf
 
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  #2  
Old 10-02-02, 12:42 PM
J
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With most ranges, you can either hard-wire them or plug them in -- your choice. It's really just a servicing convenience issue.

If the range was originally wired in 1975, you almost certainly only have three wires, so you should buy a three-hole receptacle, and a 3-prong cord and plug. Both are still available.

The new range should come with two sets of instructions -- one for a 3-wire connection and one for a 4-wire connection. You will be following the 3-wire connection instructions.
 
  #3  
Old 10-02-02, 12:45 PM
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texsparky
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Hi Garf,
This could turn into more work than you have anticipated,depending on what type of wire was used originally.If 4 wires were ran originally,you will be in great shape.Unfortunately it is most likely 3 wire. It would be easier if you turn off the circuit and open the j-box and let us know what size wire,how many wires,and what type of wiring(romex,conduit,service entrance)is used.

John
The way that I interpret 250.140 to continue to use this circuit it would have to be ..
(1)Supply circuit 120/240-volt,single phase 3 wire (ok here)
(2)the grounded conductor is not smaller than #10 cu. or #8 alum.
(? don't know)
(3)the grounded conductor is insulated,or the grounded conductor is uninsulated and part of a Type SE service-entrance cable and the branch circuit originates at the service equipment.....(? don't know)
(4)Grounding contacts of receptacles furnished as part of the equipment are bonded to the equipment..(? don't know)

All of these conditions must be met(with no exceptions) and if not the circuit must be replaced with a 4 wire. I've questioned what is the difference between a bare wire in a Type NM cable and a Type SE cable and was told that the Code Making Panel didn't elaborate on it,but just had to draw the line somewhere in regards to existing installations.IMO there is no difference but rules are rules.
 

Last edited by texsparky; 10-02-02 at 01:06 PM.
  #4  
Old 10-02-02, 12:49 PM
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garafola
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Thank-you,

I'll open up the JB tonight and let you know what I find.

garf
 
  #5  
Old 10-02-02, 04:34 PM
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garafola
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Hi texsparky

I opened up the jb and found

"Kaiser aluminum B type SE cable xhhw cdrs - 6awg al3 300 volt to ground"

Not sure what all that means?

I flipped a double breaker at the main fuse box to shut this off.
It is the only thing on that circuit.

The existing connection looks like this:

1. shielded cable twisted together and twisted to a bare copper and a white from the old oven.

2. a black to a black

3. a black with red stripe to a solid red from oven

I went out and purchased a 50A-125/250v non grounding range outlet - leviton 3-pole 3 wire single range outlet approved for copper or alumin.

The warnings on the box read:

1. outlet must be wired to a seperate 3 wire circuit of up to #4 awg size conductors

2. this device is not designated for grounding use. connect to only to non grounding circuits.

If the receptacle I purchased will work, I will have another question:

The connection diagram is vague.
It shows white going to a certain terminal, which will be my twisted sheilding...right?
the others just note 250v
Does it matter which goes to which at this point?

Thanks for you help?
Paul
 
  #6  
Old 10-02-02, 05:47 PM
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texsparky
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It's good to hear that you have Type SE cable. The wire is rated for a 50 amp circuit.You've purchased the correct receptacle.
You are correct that the bare wire will go to what is indicated white on your instructions.(This will be the center terminal on the outlet. It doesnt make any difference on the other two as to which side they hook up to.Be sure the breaker feeding this is no larger than 50 amp.Your new range will probably come without a cord,so purchase the three wire and follow the manuf.instructions.
 
  #7  
Old 10-02-02, 06:34 PM
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I think texsparky may have missed the fact that you said the wire was aluminum.
 
  #8  
Old 10-02-02, 07:10 PM
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texsparky
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John,I caught the aluminum part of post. Art.250.140 doesn't exclude alum. The device he bought is rated copper or alum. and xxhw 6 is rated for 50amps in the 75 degree column.Please enlighten me.
 
  #9  
Old 10-02-02, 07:17 PM
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Sorry. My bad. Disregard my prior post.
 
  #10  
Old 10-02-02, 07:41 PM
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garafola
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Thank-you for all your great help,
it is good to know that someone with basic knowledge of electricity can ask questions to experts and tackle home improvements, without spending 100+ dollars an hour for a 10 minute job.

I am learning so much just reading all the posts on this site
 
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