Power in regular outlet

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  #1  
Old 10-07-02, 05:46 AM
W
Whipper
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Power in regular outlet

I have serveral outlets (plugs) in a room and there are all on a 15 amp breaker. I assume that the amount of power available to me is 15 amps x 125 volts = 1875 watts. Is this correct?? Once I use all of this power with computer, lamp, radio, etc.. I assume the breaker will trip?

Also, I purchased one of these two pronged testers which test for power and ground. I checked the plugs in the living room and dining room and I got power and ground. However, the plugs in my kitchen did not show any ground?? Is there some reason for this or are they just not grounded? I tested them by putting one prong on the hot and one in the ground on a three prong plug.

Thanks,

Whipper
 
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  #2  
Old 10-07-02, 06:34 AM
J
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Yes, you are correct. It is more common to assume 120 volts rather than 125, but the results are similar. The breaker trips based on how much over you are and how long you've been there. Short periods of usage slightly over capacity will not necessarily trip the breaker.

Yes, it does sound like your kitchen receptacles are not grounded. You might want to invest $7 in a three-prong outlet tester.

It is possible that your living room receptacles don't have ground either. Sometimes people unwisely connect the neutral and ground together (called a bootleg ground), which is not only very dangerous, but gives the false impression that you have a ground.
 
  #3  
Old 10-09-02, 03:55 AM
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Whipper
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John,

I checked the outlets in my kitchen with a 3-pronged tester and found out that the Hot and Neutral wires are on the wrong screws. They need to be revesed. What exactly does this mean? Is there any harm in having it done this way? Just curious?

Thanks,

Whipper
 
  #4  
Old 10-09-02, 06:34 AM
J
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It means the black and white wires are on the wrong sides of the receptacle. It takes just a few minutes to correct them, and this will result in a safer receptacle. Use your outlet tester afterwards to verify that you got it right. And make sure you have GFCI protection too. You can't use the tester to verify GFCI if you don't have a ground, so simply push the test button on the GFCI to verify that all kitchen receptacles go dead.
 
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