help with panel

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  #1  
Old 11-08-02, 01:03 AM
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help with panel

Hi im planning to rewire house to replace old knob $tubing,Service is 100 Amps ,panel has one 40 Amps double fuse and two rows of four fuses each[total eight].All 15 Amps fuses
#1 FUSE serves the basement[four lights and four receptacules]

#2&6 Hot watwer tank
#3 ALL PLUGS FIRST FLOOR [ABOUT 6] TWO PLUGS ONE SECOND FLOOR BEDROOM AND 3 LIGHTS FIRST FLOOR.


#4 one LIGHT ONLY///// IF YOU CAN BELEIVE IT

#5 ONE PLUG FOR MICRIWAVE

#7 kITCHEN LIGHT, FRIDGE PLUG,DR light,[all first floor] lights for 3 beedrooms,bathroom,two bedrooms plugs[second floor]

The panel seems to be in good conditon and i was hopping no to change it for a while.

It seems that i have only 3 fuses available now for 3 new branchesand that may not be enoughWould a subpanel help and if so how to conect it many thanks to all the dedicated soles that try to help the uniniciated tnx a million papi
 
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  #2  
Old 11-08-02, 01:34 AM
STIMPY21
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It sounds like you have quite a mess there. I had a similar situation when I bought my house, 3800 sq ft pre-1900. It looked like the took the hot and ran it to everything and then started from a different point and ran the neutral, any way , if you are going to re wire, you should separate your lighting circuits and your recepticles. I believe that you could consolidate your lights on to two 15 Amp circuits without using a subpanel, leaving separate circuits for the water heater, refridgerator, and microwave. Kitchen and bathroom circuits near the sink and close enough to have any possibility of getting wet need to be gfci. I do not have an electrical license, but I have wired a couple of houses that I owned at the time and never had any problems with anything electrical or the electrical inspector. I run no more than 8 recepticles on a 15 amp circuit, any high current dedicated device like refridegerator, water heater, microwave, washer gets its own seperate line. For lighting much the same except that if I'm going to install a couple of ceiling fans I decrease the # of lights. I also try to seperate the lights out so that if a breaker trips, that the whole house won't be in the dark. so if you have 2 lighting circuits, and dedicated circuits for microwave , fridge, and hot water heater, 1 gfci 20 amp with recpticles in bathroom and kitchen and 2 general type recepticle circuits, you can get by with the 8 fuses. Be cafeful and if in doubt consult a licensed electrician in your area.What is the double pole 40 for??
STIMPY21
 
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Old 11-08-02, 05:53 AM
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You are not allowed to put bathroom and kitchen recepticles on the same circuit. Bathroom has to be on its own circuit. You can combine bathrooms with bathrooms but not with anything else.
 
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Old 11-08-02, 10:45 PM
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HI HI

Thanks a lot for sugestions, much appreciated.40 Amps fuse block is for the stove
regards papi
 
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Old 11-09-02, 07:29 PM
STIMPY21
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joed on 2 seperate ocassions I have added a cfgi for a bathroom to 3 kitchen gfcis and the inspector saw it and didn't kick on it all. Both bathrooms were teeny tiny, not much bigger than twice the size of the bathtub.However, as we both know what flies in one locality is complete no-no in another, also each inspector is a little different. Your probably right though, that sounds like something you'd find in the NEC. But if I didn't have to have an inspection and I only needed 1 gfci for a shaver, or ma's hair curling iron in the bathroom, I'd do it again. It is not that it is really unsafe, it is just one of those technicalities. If that is the only corner you cut in rewiring an old knob and tube job, papi pat your self on the back, you done good...
STIMPY21
 
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Old 11-10-02, 07:33 PM
bwetzel
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Code is Code and it is in there for a reason. Cutting corners is the main reason our code book is so thick! And continues to get thicker. Do it right the first time or don't do it at all. You need a 20 amp circuit for bathrooms. You may put everything WITHIN this bathroom on this circuit. OR you may put all bathroom recpt in the house on one 20 amp circuit as long as there is nothing else on this circuit.(you may not put the lights or fans on this circuit if you include more than one bathroom)
hope this helps.
Brian
 
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Old 11-10-02, 08:59 PM
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Hi all tnx again for help. Regarding bathrooms been on separate circuits im sure there must be a reason but i dont know what is it.

I like to do everithing by the code since i know nothing compare to the folks who wrote it but at the same time i know that in other areas been LEGAL DOES NOT MEAN SAFE//////. For example
flying aircrafts is govern by a lot of rules that you MUST comply with at all times to be legal, however some of these rules would allow you to fly at night ,in poor visibility and bad weather over mountains or what have ,you with trusting passengers without an instrument rating ////// all this been legal but extreamely UNSAFE.

Regards to all and i appreciate youe input regards papi
 
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Old 11-10-02, 09:49 PM
STIMPY21
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Your right code is code, the whole problem is that a 100 amp panel is substandard. The gentleman wanted to rework an existing 100 amp panel. The correct answer to the situation is that it is not code worthy to do so, further more, Nec frowns on electrical work by non licensed individuals, and actually prohibits it I believe if money is involved.. I would never want anyone to do anything that would be unsafe, either immediatley or in the future. It would be best to spend 140 dollars and get a new 200 amp panel. I have done a bit of electrical work, seen quite a bit of it that obviously was done with absolutely no regard to the NEC. And I have also seen work done by those that would ride one line of code into the ground whilst being completely indiferent to the rest of the book, and the inspector would let them get away with it, because they had his pet items taken care of. I have seen apt buildings built to the letter of the code and would not function as they were desighned to do, due to derating which is expressedly allowed for multi-family housing. Papi save up the 140.00 and get a 200 amp panel, it would be the code worthy thing to do.
STIMPY21
 
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Old 11-10-02, 10:49 PM
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tnx again st 21, there is no money involved here, it is my house.

i m not traying to save $ and compromise safety ,it is that the old panel seems to be in very good condition ,service to the house is 100 Amps,upgrading to 200 is about $ 1200 in my location+ cost of panel////////.
regards papi
 
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Old 11-11-02, 02:25 PM
bwetzel
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Why is it that you think a 100 amp panel is substandard? There are many houses where this is a suitable choice. As far as code on this issue, as long as he doesn't change the way the panel is designed, he is fine.
I think if it were me, I would buy a new 100amp panel/with breakers combo at home depot for $68 and install that. This will give you 20 circuit spaces. Plenty for future expansion.
Hope this helps.
Brian
 
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