Electric shower

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-12-02, 10:05 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 949
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Electric shower

I just came back from renting a cabin in the north woods. One of the guys said that he got a minor electrical tingle when he touched the faucet in the shower; no one else experienced this. We told the owner and he said he heard this once before, so he had an electrician come out. The electrician checked everything (especially grounding), but couldn't find anything wrong. Anyone out there have any ideas? This is really scarry; we stay at the same place every year for deer hunting.

Bruce
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-12-02, 10:54 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Brethren, Mi
Posts: 1,648
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Is this an electric water heater? Is the piping in the place plastic connecting to the heater? If electric heater is used I find every once in a while some handyman type has cut the grounding wire off from it,,, I have no clue why,, but they do. When there is leakage from the elements it has no where to go but thru the water and really shows up when its running. This is not to say thats the problem but it is another scenario that has happened.
 
  #3  
Old 11-13-02, 04:30 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 949
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Thanks for the response. It is an electric water heater and all the piping in the cabin is copper. I forwarded your response on to the owner; his electrician may have missed something in checking out the problem.

Bruce
 
  #4  
Old 11-13-02, 05:19 AM
I
Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 186
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Another explanation is "stray voltage" . Try googling for it. It's caused by a difference in potential between ground and neutral and is not a rare occurrence. If the drain system is cast iron and the hot and cold water piping is copper an easy solution is to bond the whole thing together. There are some other potential causes such as telephone or cable TV.

hth,
Ichabod
 
  #5  
Old 11-13-02, 07:21 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Brethren, Mi
Posts: 1,648
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, being all metal and if it is bonded to the grounding system properly there should be no potential voltage difference. Now there is something else that happens often here,,, Did the owner get an electrician or a handyman that does some electric maintance. There are a lot of details involving grounding and bonding and we all have seen some strange stuff done,,, for who knows what reason. Being a rental cabin I am assuming that it is subfed from the main service could also cause some substancial complications with grounding between buildings.
 
  #6  
Old 11-15-02, 04:21 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 949
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
sberry27 and Ichabod:
Thanks so much for your responses. My nephews are going up north next weekend and will give them to the owner; owner says he is going to get his electrician back out. Is there any way of knowing if this could be a life safety issue or is it just a minor irritant?

Bruce
 
  #7  
Old 11-15-02, 06:53 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Brethren, Mi
Posts: 1,648
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That is the question. It could be either. Thats why it should be figured out. There is also the possibility that the potential could change at any time. I deally there should be 4 wire between the entrance and the cabin panel with the cabin not bonded to neutral and having its own ground rods. If it is 3 wire it should be bonded and have ground rods also. This should eleminate any poential difference if the plumbing is bonded to the electric system.
 
  #8  
Old 11-15-02, 01:30 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Kansas City, KS
Posts: 588
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I just had a class on this yesterday for some extra CEUs. The instructor talked about grounds being different when they are seperated (even if they both are grounded).

Always make sure that both your sewage pipes (especially cast iron)And water pipes are all bonded together to the SAME ground point, or at least tied together somewhere. If they are both grounded on opposite sides of the house, but not tied together anywhere they can be totally different Potential Values. Especially in an electrical storm. And they will drift potentials like crazy so its hard to track it.
 
  #9  
Old 11-17-02, 02:50 PM
54regcab's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Oklahoma City
Posts: 661
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Scary

I once replaced a water main and got shocked by the old pipe coming out of the ground.
Turns out the pipe was used for grounding the house !!!
Jumpering the old pipe to the water meter with a #6 solid copper wire solved the problem.
Alos make sure the meter, the cold water pipes and the breaker box are all physically connected with a good ground !!
 
  #10  
Old 12-01-02, 01:19 PM
M
matkinusa1
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
electric shower

This post reminded me of an odd thing that happened at work one time. I got shocked on one of our machines. I turned in a work order to have it repaired. The electrician could find no short or discharge. Eight other people came over and touched it as I did. No one could feel it except for me. They then tested it again and the milliamp reading was so low that it should not have been felt. Must have been my body chemistry or something. Just out of curiosity they tried to trace it down, but the further away from the shock point they went, they lost the current. Never did figure it out.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: