outlets on a circuit?

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  #1  
Old 12-01-02, 07:30 AM
liberty
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outlets on a circuit?

How many outlets and lights can go on a:
15a circuit?
20a circuit?
 
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Old 12-01-02, 08:04 AM
hotarc
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I don't think there is an actual rule on this one, but you could put 8 outlets on a 15 amp circuit and 10 on a 20 amp, assuming a load of 180 VA each. This would load the circuit up to 80%, the maximum acceptable continuous load. Of course if you know exactly what you'll be plugging in you could always install a few more or a few less depending on your particular needs.
 
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Old 12-01-02, 09:23 AM
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There is no restriction in the NEC except kitchen and bathrooms. You have to be resonable according to what is expected to be on the circuits.
 
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Old 12-01-02, 09:27 AM
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There is no national rule on number of outlets on a circuit in a dwelling, but some cities (a small minority, I believe) have local rules. You'd need to call your building department and ask.

As joed suggested, there are a million other rules about what outlets can go on what circuits, and how many general lighting circuits are needed based on the size of the house. None of these rules, however, count the outlets.

If you post back with the specifics of the project you are considering, we can help you sort through the rules that apply. We can also help you design a system that will work for the intended purpose. The electrical code is only concerned with safety, but you need to also make sure that your project will serve your needs.
 
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Old 12-01-02, 08:09 PM
liberty
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More project info

I am in the midst of renovating my kitchen, that involves claiming the breeze-way that connects the house to the garage as part of the kitchen. I have a 100 Amp main panel that has all circuit breaker slots filled however I have found most of them to be minimally loaded. I am planning to add a garbage disposal as well as recessed cans and other modern amenities. My goal is to not install a sub panel and try to make good of my existing panel by fine tuning what is there and possible the use of tandem circuit breakers. Any comments on the electrical design and layout?
 
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Old 12-01-02, 08:27 PM
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For very good reasons, the kitchen is the most regulated room in the house -- there is little room for personal design choices. You should do quite a bit of research into all the codes governing the kitchen before starting. Many good home wiring books cover these rules.
 
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