What defines a Kitchen?

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  #1  
Old 12-09-02, 04:57 PM
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brianbes
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What defines a Kitchen?

I posted earlier on the room with the service panel that I want to put a fridge and bar sink in. I guess on 2002 code you need 2 20 amp circuits for a kitchen and outlets 4' apart but this wouldn't be practical cause I need to stay away 36" from the front of the panel and allow it 30" of space on the side before I put an outlet (will make it 36" to be safe). Can I use the standard 10' rule instead as I really just need one 20 amp circuit in there for the fridge and a want a few outlets for the counter top to run a blender or coffee maker. No oven or microwave will be in this room. Will one circuit be okay?
 
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Old 12-10-02, 11:46 AM
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If you don't get an answer here, call your county/city

and ask them what constitutes a "kitchen" for your area.

Here in NC, we must also install a GFCI for the counter outlets. ($7 for a GFCI outlet at Home Depot) Just make sure that if you wire multiple outlets, the GFCI outlet is the one closest to the breaker box.
 
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Old 12-11-02, 06:28 PM
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Wgoodrich
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You said;

I really just need one 20 amp circuit in there for the fridge and a want a few outlets for the counter top to run a blender or coffee maker. No oven or microwave will be in this room. Will one circuit be okay?

Reply;

Using approximate loads of those listed appliances your coffee pot would pull about 1500 watts. If you have a toaster @ 1500 watts or electric skillet @ 1500 watts you would be way over the maximum load capable on a 20 amp circuit of approximately 2400 watts per circuit.

If you have any appliances other than the coffee pot that is also with resistant heat such as a toaster, fryer, electric skillet, cheeze melter etc. and plug one of these appliances into a single twenty amp circuit with your coffee pot you would be trying to pull approximately 3000 watts from a circuit capable of carrying 2400 watts.

If you have a room for preparing food you must consider it a kitchen. In a kitchen you don't just have a 4' rule you have a 2' / 4' rule. This means any counter space must have a receptacle within 2' of any end of the counter and not more than 4' between any two receptacles. You are also required to install a receptacle on any counter space along the wall that is 12" wide or wider as a minimum.

You will be short sheeting yourself and shortly after use you will be kicking yourself if you do not install a minimum of 2 -20 amp small appliance branch circuits [kitchen receptacles] over your counter.

If you wish to save money then the NEC allows you to include on those two 20 amp small appliance branch circuits serving the kitchen counter any island or pennisular receptacles, any dining room receptacles, any nook receptacles, any pantry receptacles, one clock receptacle, a receptacle serving igniters for a gas stove, and even the refrigerator.

Do yourself a favor and install at least two 20 amp small appliance branch circuits to serve your kitchen counter area. Share those receptacle circuits with those loads listed above if you like but at least have two 20 amp branch circuits over you counter area.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
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Old 12-13-02, 06:06 AM
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brianbes
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WG, thanks for the help on the 2 circuits for the kitchen, I will run 2 - 20 amp circuits. You mentioned outlets must be every 4'. On one wall that faces my hangout room I opened the wall up 5' and am going to build a 42" high wall so its bar height. There would be countertop under that opening in the kitchen. Does that rule apply here as why would you want to put an outlet in the middle of that opening. I can put one on the far left above the counter and one past the end of the counter on the far right for the fridge. The wall the counter is on is 104". So starting from the left I would put an outlet then it runs under the opening and stops then I have the refrigerator opening which I would want to put an outlet in the center of that opening. The counter will be 6' with the remaining space for the refrigerator-want to leave plenty of space so if someone wants to put a 32" refrigerator they can. I don't envision any appliances on that counter as on the wall behind it would another 6' counter with my sink and thats were I would put any appliances. Galley kitchen setup. Also the outlet for the Refrigerator should that me normal height off the floor or 41" off the floor which I believe is normal height for outlets over the counter if you have a 36" high countertop.
 
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Old 12-14-02, 12:08 AM
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Wgoodrich
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You have a boarder line situation that only your AHJ [local electrical inspector appointed as your authority having jurisdiction] can make a ruling on. It can swing either way. You are not really an island or peninsular but along a wall with a section that has no wall. Gray areas are what make the AHJ tick. Make a phone call to obtain a ruling on the subject.

I suggest bottom of your switches and receptacles to be 42" from the bottom. If you go 41" your back splash and your receptacle or switch plate may collide. You are leaving no room for error. I suggest 42" instead of 41" from subfloor.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
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