GFCI in unfinished basement ???


  #1  
Old 01-14-03, 01:31 PM
W
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GFCI in unfinished basement ???

I saw where a previous poster had mentioned putting a chest freezer in his basement. I am rewiring my unfinished basement and am considering putting in a freezer as well, but how do I get around the GFCI issue??
With my luck, I would go down to the basement one day only to find the GFCI tripped days earlier and allowed my rump roast to thoroughly defrost. I know its probably an issue for my inspector, but I just wanted some input.

I may have a couple aquariums down there as well that will require a reliable power supply for heaters, chillers, filters and pumps.

wingnut
 
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Old 01-14-03, 01:44 PM
S
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You can run a dedicated circuit for the freezer without gfci. I am not sure how an inspector would feel and we need a bit of input here but I would be comfortable with putting the gfci after the freezer if you wanted to extend circuit. You might do the same with the aquarium or maybe use the other side of the duplex from the freezer to run that. I am sure someone would on an exception for that as is for the freezer because it is to protect sensitive property.
 
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Old 01-14-03, 02:01 PM
brickeyee
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You may put in a dedicated circuit for the freezer without a GFCI. I would not extend the circuit any further with a GFCI unless you want to take a chance on tripping the breaker (not the GFCI) and having a melt down. The box for the freezer should have a single receptacle, and if it partl way behind the freezer, it will pass easier.
 
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Old 01-14-03, 06:52 PM
J
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Code does not require a dedicated circuit to use the GFCI exception. Only a dedicated receptacle. It's perfectly fine to start the GFCI protection after the freezer assuming the circuit has the capacity to run both the freezer and other things. This depends on both the circuit and the freezer. Do the math!
 
  #5  
Old 01-15-03, 08:25 AM
brickeyee
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I know the code does not require a dedicated recep for the freezer exception. The meltdown I was refering to was the contents of the freezer if someone overloads the circuit and the breaker trips. I would never install anything else on a circuit with a freezer. I have seen people loose hundreds of dollars worth of food when the breaker tripped on a shared circuit.
 
 

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