Basement Lighting


  #1  
Old 01-19-03, 06:22 PM
gtrshop
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Smile Basement Lighting

I'm planning on adding some recessed lighting to our basement hobby room. The goal is to have little reflected light from the ceiling. Direct lighting of the hobby area for a brighter, focused effect is what I'm after. The current incadecent lighting, coupled with the unfinished cieling gives the room an overall orage or brown feel - so much so that photo are often off colour.

Now here's my question(s). I'm trying to make sure the area(s) are adequately illuminated, but don't have even a guess as to how close or how far apart to mount the light fixtures. The table is 55" from the bottom of the joist, and as much as possible I'd like to avoid lighting walls and such.

Does anyone know where I can find a giude, FAQ, or reference to correctly locating the fixtures? Are there different lamp bulbs with different focus characteristics? Again the distance from the light source to the work area is 55"

Thanks for the read.
 
  #2  
Old 01-19-03, 09:26 PM
J
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I have found this site to be quite useful. When in doubt, add more and use a dimmer.
 
  #3  
Old 01-21-03, 06:27 AM
gtrshop
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RE

I checked out the site you mentioned. It had some good information, but what was there was stiff too vague to be of any help. I have come across a product book from Juno that might come close to answering my question, but it still leaves a bit to be interperted, all that changes when you select different bulbs...

Still looking for clues...
 
  #4  
Old 01-21-03, 07:31 AM
J
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There are just too many variables, such as color of the walls and ceiling, size and shape of the room, amount and placement of windows, exact nature of the activites, age and eyesight of the occupants, and height of the ceiling. Besides, the human eye is amazingly adaptable and can adjust to a wide variety of lighting levels.

All of that is why I say, "When in doubt, add more and use a dimmer."

Personally, I really like the light from 65 watt PAR flood lights in recessed cans.
 
  #5  
Old 01-21-03, 08:58 AM
RickJ6956
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Color temperature of the lights will be just as important as the number and placement of fixtures. Just as film comes in "Daylight" and "Tungsten (indoor)" varieties, lighting is rated by color temperature in degrees Kelvin (K).

Incandescent lights are very low -- usually well under 3200K. Dimming them lowers the color temp even more. The lower the temp, the more they swing toward the red side of the spectrum.

Fluorescents are in the neighborhood of 5,500K, which will give a slight green cast to the light.

"Daylight" balance is normally 6500K or higher, and swings the hue toward blue.

Our eyes compensate by automatically "white balancing" in nearly all environments, but cameras (especially video cameras) have limits.

Try changing out the bulbs in your basement to "Daylight" balance. It will help offset the reddish reflections from the natural wood. Also, a coat of white primer/paint over the exposed wood will eliminate the problem altogether and make the entire room quite a bit brighter.
 
 

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