Tough Problem

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Old 02-21-03, 11:15 AM
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Tough Problem

Please advise. One leg of my incoming power (at the panel) reads about 90V. The other leg is fine.
When anything is plugged into the kitchen outlets (only certain ones), the power drops to almost zero (as read with meter).
There are no GFCI's on the circuit.
I have never ran across this before. Any help will be appreciated.
Brian
 
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Old 02-21-03, 11:26 AM
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you have lost one leg of your power. It could be out at the pole. Or a bad main breaker. You are reading volts through 240v appliances. And when you apply a load to it. Then you trully get what you have 000volts in that line. Check the power at the top of the main. If it is the same as the bottom of the main then the problem is the POCO. and they should be called to check the rest out.
 
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Old 02-21-03, 12:22 PM
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Until you get this fixed, turn off all double-pole breakers in your panel to avoid damage to your 120-volt appliances. I suggest calling the power company ASAP.
 
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Old 02-21-03, 01:41 PM
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John. I agree with you about this reply, however, on the several that I have been called in on. I have told the homeowners to call the POCO, and they were told it had to be verifyed by an electrician to determine if it was the POCO problem or the homeowners problem. Have you run into that where you are located, or just here where I am at?
Thanks
Keith
 
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Old 02-21-03, 02:01 PM
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If you have Aluminum Service Conductors, a corroded connection will cause this problem. You could "read" 90 volts between a terminal lug and the Neutral and 120 volts between the conductor and the Neutral because of internal corrosion inside the lug. Correct terminations of aluminum conductors are done by coating the aluminum conductor with a compound that prevents such corrosion.-----Good Luck!!!!
 
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Old 02-21-03, 02:35 PM
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Yes, some power companies will insist that the homeowner's electrician check things out first. But I'd call the power company first anyway and let them tell me that. Many power companies are glad to come out quickly and check out their side without any prior effort by the homeowner. I would always try that avenue first if it is available (since it doesn't cost me anything).
 
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Old 02-21-03, 02:45 PM
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Thank you guys. I found the problem. One of the incoming lines had burned out the lug on the meter socket. I went to an electrical supply store and found a new lug. I cut the cable back a little and reattached. I had cut the main lines first. The power company came back and reconnected the lines. This lug was burnt bad. The cable had come completely off the lug (it was probably touching intermittently. This kind of worried me but the power guy said the cable was probably loose and burned up over time.
See if you agree.
 
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Old 02-21-03, 05:17 PM
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Good to hear you got it fixed.
Without seeing it, Most likely he is correct.
 
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