Basement Subpanel

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  #1  
Old 03-05-03, 08:23 AM
T
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Basement Subpanel

Hi all,

I'm wrapping up the framing of my basement-finishing project and will be moving on to electrical soon.

I have 150-amp service with the main panel out in the garage. I only have 3 spots left in the main panel and will need more than that for the basement. I'd like to put a subpanel in the basement. It will be about 20 feet away from the main panel. I'll need the following circuits:
- 1 240V for 3 1,200 watt baseboard heaters
- 1 15 or 20 amp circuit for a fridge
- 2 15 or 20 amp circuits for outlets
- 1 20 amp circuit for lights

Can I use a 60 amp (40 maybe?) subpanel for this or do I have to go bigger? What kind of wire will I need to get to the subpanel?

Thanks,
Jim
 
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  #2  
Old 03-05-03, 09:09 AM
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Use a 60amp subpanel with at least #6 wire. Just FYI, sometimes "60amp" subpanels are hard to find, you can generally use a subpanel rated for 60-125A as long as you use a 60 amp breaker to feed it.
 
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Old 03-05-03, 09:55 AM
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Thanks for the info. Are there any restrictions with regard to placement? I'd like to put it in a partition wall I built, but I could also attach it to the foundation wall if need be.

Thanks,
Jim
 
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Old 03-05-03, 10:06 AM
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Get a 100A main lug panel. It will not have a main breaker. You will need to run a 4-wire cable from your main panel. You will need to purchase a ground bar to install in the new panel. Do not use the "bonding screw" that will come with the panel. Hook your neutrals to the insulated (from the "can") bar in the panel and hook your grounds to the ground bar which is mounted directly to the can. Install a breaker in your main panel sized to protect the cable you choose. For instance, if you choose a 6-3 w/ground romex cable you will need a 50A double pole breaker. If you choose a #6 SER Cu cable, I believe you can go up to a 60 amp breaker. If you mount your panel to the surface of a wall, choose a surface mount panel. If you mount it inside a sheetrock wall, choose a flush mount panel.
 
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Old 03-05-03, 10:59 AM
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Thanks for the info. I'm really glad I found this place!

Jim
 
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Old 03-05-03, 11:24 AM
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The main rules for breaker box placement are:
  • Readily accessible.
  • 36" clear space in front (floor to ceiling).
  • 30" clear space side to side (floor to ceiling).
  • 6'6" headroom.
  • Not in a bathroom or clothes closet.
 
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Old 03-05-03, 11:45 AM
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Originally posted by John Nelson
The main rules for breaker box placement are:
  • Readily accessible.
  • 36" clear space in front (floor to ceiling).
  • 30" clear space side to side (floor to ceiling).
  • 6'6" headroom.
  • Not in a bathroom or clothes closet.
I got all that - so it'll be a flush-mount on the partition wall.

Thanks,
Jim
 
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