Two-hole receptacles


  #1  
Old 03-31-03, 06:17 PM
spedanden
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Please read...

Ok first....im renting a house that has 2 prong electrical outlets. Just for temporary can I install a 3 prong outlet without a ground attached, just so I dont have to use an adapter as it prevents my bed from scooting right up against the wall. Second if I were to want them properly grounded so my surge protector actually has the right connection to work would my landlord have to do this or would I and how much would it cost for say 2-3 outlets in a very small house? And to double check I have no ground all i see in the outlet are 2 black and 2 white wires. Thanks for any help!!!
 
  #2  
Old 03-31-03, 06:37 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
You may replace a two-hole receptacle with a GFCI receptacle or a three-hole receptacle if it has upstream GFCI protection. Otherwise, you may not install an ungrounded 3-hole receptacle.

There are two ways to provide grounding. One is with a grounding wire, but the other is with grounded conduit. If you have metal boxes and if your wiring is in metal conduit, you may have grounded boxes.

If you do not have grounding, but want to provide it (for the valid reasons you mentioned), a grounding wire would need to be run from the receptacle to the nearest point on the grounding electrode system (usually the panel). The cost and difficulty of this depends on how far apart they are and what is in between. Attic, unfinished basement, or crawl space access makes it a lot easier.

If you are a renter, you are probably prohibited from doing this work yourself. You must get the landlord involved, and usually the landlord must hire a licensed electrician. The exact rules depend on your city. You could call your city's building department and ask.
 
  #3  
Old 03-31-03, 09:25 PM
spedanden
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
But would temp installing a 3 prong outlet be any worse than using an adapter?
 
  #4  
Old 03-31-03, 09:36 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
They are both bad. Appliances with three-prong plugs are designed assuming that they have a ground. When installed without ground, a GFCI provides the otherwise missing safety. When installed with neither, you are taking a safety risk. How big of a risk? Who knows. Probably like driving without your seat belt on.

Consider that installing a GFCI receptacle is exactly the same effort, and only about $5 more cost, than installing a three-hole receptacle. Your safety is worth $5 I think.
 
  #5  
Old 03-31-03, 09:45 PM
spedanden
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Ok. Sorry but I know little about electic wiring. To install a GFCI do I need a ground wire still? Like I said theres only 4 wires in the outlet 2 black and 2 white, as I recall a ground is green. And would a GFCI allow my surge protector to work properly? There's als a few other reasons I wanna do this, one being when the dryer or heater fan turns on my monitor has a constant ever so slight flicker. My surge protector has variable current regulator (or whatever its called) which I believe prevents that, but it need proper grounding.
 
  #6  
Old 04-01-03, 12:49 AM
texsparky
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
You do not need a ground wire to install a GFCI receptacle. You do need a ground wire for the surge suppressor to function as designed.

You should speak to your landlord and tell him your concerns and inquire about hiring a licensed electrician to do the work.
 
  #7  
Old 04-01-03, 05:26 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 8,077
Received 529 Upvotes on 433 Posts
You are a renter and not allowed to do wiring in most states. In most areas only a qualified electrician is allowed to do work in rental property.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: