gfci installation

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  #1  
Old 04-05-03, 06:24 PM
veritas
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Question gfci installation

I am trying to install a gfci in my kitchen which is a duplex receptacle.
There is a white black and bare ground and a red wire.I am ok with all the wires except the red.Is this wire used with a gfci , if used where do i connect it and it is a live wire also like the black.
I could use help on this one, i ttried a few variations with the red wire and it did not work right and was shorted.
I turned the breaker off for now as to be safe until i find out how to fix this.
 
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Old 04-05-03, 06:39 PM
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You are in Canada, which requires split-wired receptacles in a kitchen, but does not require GFCI. I have not seen a GFCI that can be split wired, but perhaps they sell them in Canada. I recommend you put the old receptacle back in as it was before (with the black and red connected to the two brass screws). If you later find a GFCI that can be split wired, you can try again.

If you decide to put this GFCI in anyway, use either the black or the red on the brass screw on the "line" side. Cap the other one off with a wire nut.
 
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Old 04-06-03, 09:43 AM
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new rules as of Jan 2003.
Here is a cut and paste from another site.

Effective January 1, 2003 GFCI Protection will be Required for
Kitchen Counter Receptacles

The 2002 edition of the Ontario Electrical Safety Code includes an Ontario amendment to Rule 26-700,
which requires Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) protection for Kitchen Counter receptacles
effective January 1, 2003.

The new Subrule (26-700(12) states that effective January 2003:

(12) Receptacles located in kitchens and installed within 1 m of a kitchen sink along the wall
behind counter work surfaces shall be protected by a ground fault circuit interrupter of the Class A
type.

Appendix B note: Distance of 1 m is measured from edge of kitchen sink.

The following guidelines shall be used for consistent interpretation and application of this new subrule
effective January 1, 2003.

1. This rule applies to all receptacle installations located within 1 m of a kitchen sink along the wall behind
counter work surfaces where the plans or application for inspection is received on or after January 1, 2003

2. This rule applies to all kitchens.

2.1. Kitchen is defined as “a place (as a room) with cooking facilities”

2.2. A cooking facility is defined as a range or stove (electric or gas supply) for cooking. Hot plates,
microwaves, etc are not defined as a cooking facility for application of this rule.

3. In dwelling units, Rules 26-712(d) and 26-722(b) require that kitchen counter receptacles be split
receptacles connected to multi-wire 15 amp branch circuits. Rule 26 -726 permits the installation of 5-20
RA (T-slot) receptacles connected to single 20 amp branch circuits as an alternative to split receptacles and
circuits. In both cases adjacent receptacles shall not be connected to the same branch circuit.

Receptacles that are located on either side of a kitchen sink shall not be considered as adjacent for the
application of this requirement and can be connected to the same branch circuit when applying this new
rule.
 
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Old 04-06-03, 09:53 AM
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Thanks Joe. It seems that there is an exemption to the split-wiring requirement for the receptacles that need GFCI. I'm unclear what would happen if somebody wanted a GFCI more than one meter from the sink -- would the split-wiring exemption still apply?

So my original answer will seem to be sufficient (at least if the receptacle is within 1m of the sink). Simply connect to the red or the black, and don't use the other. For adjacent receptacles, alternate use of the red and black.

So Joe, did I correctly interpret what you said?
 
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Old 04-06-03, 05:37 PM
veritas
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Question gfci install

I installed the gfci and used the black as my hot wire and capped the red wire.I tested it after and it works fine.I had a house inspection and was told kitchen bathroom sinks near outlets to be replaced with gfci.
I also today which is off this subject a bit replaced outlets in my house.It seems the original wiring was black and white with the bare ground and later years someone added the red wire.
Thanks for all the help i have received on this forum
 
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Old 04-06-03, 05:55 PM
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My interpretation is that you don't need split receptacles any more. You just need 5 dedicated 20 amp circuits. I don't how it would work if you used a combination of dedicated 20 amp and split 15 amp.
 
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