adding Light fixtures

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Old 04-11-03, 07:40 PM
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Thumbs up adding Light fixtures

Hello, I am redoing a room. I have one light/fan in the center of the room. I want to add 2 recessed cans on either side of the existing light/fan. I plan tap off the existing one and have all on the one light switch. Should I run a loop or 2 seperate lines from the existing fixture? This wouldn't be considered a splice would it? I'm a newbie, but, kind of handy!!! Thanks for your time in advance!!! Eric
 
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Old 04-11-03, 08:28 PM
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There are a lot of options. The best, in my opinion, would be to run a cable from the existing fan/light box to one of the new lights, and then another cable from that new light to the other new light (even though that cable would pass in the near vicinity of the fan again). This routing will keep your fan box from being as crowded as if you ran both cable from that box.

I'm not sure what you are driving at with your "splice" question. It's pretty hard to do any electrical work whatsoever without a few splices.

I am assuming that the new can lights would be controlled by the same switch that controls the light on the fan.
 
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Old 04-11-03, 09:20 PM
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John, I read in another post of yours that a splice can't be closed up in a wall or ceiling. If I'm using wire nuts inside the fixture itself can I close it up?? My attic has a plywood floor and the cans would be under it. Thanks for your time. Eric
 
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Old 04-11-03, 09:38 PM
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The electrical boxes in which connections are made to recessed fixtures are accessible. You just don't think so because you haven't closely examined a recessed fixture. The can is removeable.
 
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Old 04-11-03, 09:41 PM
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Splices must be made in a junction box of some kind, and this box must be accessable when your done. The box the fan is attached to is an example of a junction box. You will make the connection in that box to run to the first light. The recessed light will come with its own junction box. you make the connection in there to run to the second light.

These boxes are considered accessable because you can take the light out, or the fan down to get to them. This works the same way with outlets and switches. All connections are made in these boxes.

You can not cover up the box with drywall or the such. Here is an example: your running wire and you come up 5' too short. So you just make a splice and tape everything up and "hide" it in the wall when your done. This is wrong, becuse you can not get to this splice with out ripping the wall apart (even if you knew where it was). Even if you put the splice inside a box it would still be wrong since you still had to rip the wall apart to get to it. Now if you put a box in, and left a blank face plate on it, or put an outlet or switch in it, then it would be OK since you may get to the connections easily.
 
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